• Kindergarten
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  • Grade - 1
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  • Grade - 2
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  • Grade - 3
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  • Grade - 4
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  • Grade - 5
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  • Grade - 6
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  • Grade - 7
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  • Grade - 8
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  • Biology

Kindergarten Course Description
Unit Describing Objects
Science Concepts TEKS K.5 A, B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that objects can be described and compared with each other based on their size, shape, and mass. They learn to describe objects as heavy, light, big, and small. They are introduced to the basic concepts of mass and volume.
The students also learn that objects can change properties by heating and cooling. They can freeze, melt, and evaporate. They can be solid, liquid, or gas.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students follow instructions and learn how to compare different objects based on their size and mass. The students compare two objects at a time and tell if the objects are bigger or smaller, and heavier or lighter.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students' ability to identify and compare the physical properties of objects including size, mass, color, texture, and state. They also test their ability to recognize changes caused by heating or cooling.
Unit See, Feel, and Hear
Science Concepts TEKS K.6 A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students are introduced to light energy, heat energy, and sound energy. They are made to recognize some common sources of these three types of energy, and to understand how energy is observed through the senses of sight, touch, and hearing. They are familiarized with the concept that light, heat, and sound energy can be sensed using different sense organs—eyes, skin, and ears respectively.
Interactivity A simple interactive section, in which students predict which senses are used to observe certain forms of energy, is integrated within the main section of the Instruction Module.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the students’ understanding of the sources and the senses associated with light energy, heat energy, and sound energy.
Unit Attractions
Science Concepts TEKS K.6 B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students are introduced to magnets. They recognize that magnets attract some objects such as refrigerator doors and paper clips that contain iron. They learn that magnets are of different shapes and sizes and have two ends which are usually colored differently; different colored ends (unlike poles) attract each other and similar colored ends (like poles) repel each other.
Interactivity A simple interactive section, in which students predict which objects are attracted to magnets, is integrated within the main section of the Instruction Module.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test student’ understanding of the following concepts: objects that are attracted to magnets, and attraction and repulsion between two magnets.
Unit Place and Location
Science Concepts TEKS K.6 C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that every object has a location. They are introduced to the concept of location and that an object’s location can be described in relation to another object. Students learn to identify locations such as above, below, behind, beside, and in front of, in relation to other objects.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students identify the locations of various objects in a playground in relation to a slide.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concept: locations of objects in relation to other objects.
Unit Moving Objects
Science Concepts TEKS K.6 D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students are introduced to the movement of objects. They recognize and learn about different types of movement. They observe objects that move straight, round and round, up and down, and in a zigzag manner. They are also introduced to the fast and slow movement.
Interactivity In this interactive section, students are shown zigzag, straight, and round paths that lead to different destinations. They observe the shape of the paths and decide the kind of motion required to reach the destination.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test student’ understanding of the following concepts: fast and slow moving objects and different kinds of motion.
Unit Describing Rocks
Science Concepts TEKS K.7 A, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students observe that rocks come in different shapes, sizes, colors, and textures. By comparing the characteristics of different rocks, they learn to sort them into the various categories. Students also understand the different uses of rocks and soils by learning about the numerous ways in which rocks help us in our daily lives.
Interactivity In this interactivity, students understand the different characteristics of rocks by identifying and sorting rocks on the basis of their properties. Students demonstrate an understanding of properties by selecting a specific rock based on its properties.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: characteristics of rocks, objects made from rocks, sorting rocks by their properties.
Unit Describing Water
Science Concepts TEKS K.7 B, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students observe and describe physical properties of water including color and clarity. They learn that water is found in different forms such as clouds, rain, snow and ice. They also identify natural sources of water such as lakes, rivers and oceans and classify them as freshwater and salt water. Students recognize that water is very useful and is used for a variety of purposes such as drinking, washing, cooking, cleaning and farming.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students describe the different physical properties of water.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: Uses of water, forms of water, physical properties of water, and sources of natural water.
Unit Daily Changes and Repeating Patterns
Science Concepts TEKS K.8 A, B, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students identify events that have repeating patterns such as changing seasons of the year, changes of objects in the sky such as the Sun and Moon that cause day and night, and changes in the shape of the moon that repeats every month.
Interactivity Students know that the Sun, Moon, and seasons form a repeating pattern in the natural world. In this Interactivity, students identify and arrange some of the activities that they do throughout the day to form a repeating pattern.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: Identifying and describing daily patterns such as day and night and repeating patterns such as seasons and the changes in the shape of the moon.
Expository Text Passage Exploring What Scientists Do – Meteorologists: Scientists Who Study Weather
TEKS: K.1A, B, C; K.2A, B, C, D; K.3B, C; K.4A(demonstration thermometer, wind socks), B; K.8A, C
Unit Needs of Plants and Animals
Science Concepts TEKS K.9 A, B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students recognize the difference between living things and nonliving things based on their basic needs or lack of needs. The student learns that humans, animals, and plants are living things. They learn more about each of the needs of living things. Students are introduced to the concept of an offspring.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students identify and categorize things on a farm into living things and nonliving things based on concepts covered in the lesson.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the students’ understanding of the following concepts: differences between living and nonliving things, the basic needs of living things, identifying the basic need and identifying the offspring.
Expository Text Passage Exploring What Scientists Do – Entomologists: Scientists Who Study Insects
TEKS: K.1A, B, C; K.2B, C, D, E; K.3B, C; K.4A, B; K.9B
Unit Plants and Animals
Science Concepts TEKS K.10 A, B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that plants and animals have physical characteristics that help them survive in their environment. They learn to identify different parts of a plant such as the roots, stem and leaves and learn about their functions. They learn that physical features of plants such as leaf shape can be used to sort plants into different groups. They also learn that physical characteristics of animals such as body coverings can be used to sort animals into different groups.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this Instruction Module, students apply their understanding of plant and animal body parts by matching different plants and animals with their missing body parts. They also identify plants and animals based on where they live and their physical characteristics.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the students’ understanding of the following concepts: parts of a plant and their functions, physical characteristics of animals, and sorting of plants and animals based on their characteristics.
Unit Fruit from a Seed
Science Concepts TEKS K.10 C, D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students understand the changes that a plant undergoes in its life cycle. They learn to identify a seed, a seedling, a flower, the fruit, the leaf, the stem, and the root of a plant. Students also understand that a plant needs sunlight, food, soil, and air to survive and grow. By comparing the adult plant with the young plant, students learn to identify the similarities and differences between the two.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students learn to identify the order and names of the different stages in the growth of a plant. They do this by putting the pictures of the stages in the life cycle of a pumpkin plant, in order, from seed to fruit.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: stages in the life cycle of a plant, identifying a plant part, needs of a plant.
Expository Text Passage Patterns and Properties – The Life Cycle of a Bean Plant
TEKS: K.1A, B, C; K.2A, C, D; K.3B, C; K.4A; K.8; K.9B; K.10B,D
Grade 1 Course Description
Unit Sorting and Changing Matter
Science Concepts TEKS 1.5 A, B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn to classify matter by recognizing properties such as size, mass, color, and texture.
Students also observe the changes that occur in matter when heated or cooled: melting and freezing.
Interactivity In this Interactivity, students classify objects based on their physical properties of mass, size, shape, and color.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test student’ understanding of the following concepts: basis on which matter is sorted, properties of matter such as color and changes that occur in matter.
Unit Energy and Its Uses
Science Concepts TEKS 1.6 A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn the concept of energy and its importance in everyday life. They are also introduced to three forms of energy, namely light energy, heat energy, and sound energy, and the uses of each of the three forms. They understand that while the different forms of energy cannot be touched, they can be experienced in many ways; light energy can be seen, heat energy can be felt, and sound energy can be heard.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students are required to “energize” various objects in a toy house by identifying the type(s) of energy each of them uses or gives out.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: the form(s) of energy objects use or give out, and which sense helps us experience one of the forms of energy.
Unit Magnets – Push or Pull?
Science Concepts TEKS 1.6 B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students recognize that force and motion are part of everyday life and magnets can exert force. They recognize that magnets have two poles and that opposite poles attract each other while similar poles repel each other. They learn that magnets can be used to push or pull objects.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students identify objects that are attracted to magnets. They “use” a magnet to pick up the magnetic objects. Then, they use a magnet to attract and repel other magnets in order to “collect” them.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: force, magnets, and magnetic attraction and repulsion.
Unit How Do They Move?
Science Concepts TEKS 1.6 C, D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students observe various moving objects in a fair including a Ferris wheel, a pendulum boat, pigs in a race, and a cable car, and identify how they are moving. They recognize the different ways in which objects can move such as, in a straight line, up and down, back and forth, round and round, and fast and slow. They learn to describe the change in the location of an object using words such as closer to, nearer to, and farther from.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students observe animals moving in different ways and identify the words that describe the movement of each animal.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: words used to describe the movement of objects, patterns or traces made by moving objects, and objects that move in different ways.
Unit Using Rocks, Soil, and Water
Science Concepts TEKS 1.7 A, B, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students will learn to identify and compare the color, composition, and the different layers of soil, and sort components of soil such as sand, silt, and clay based on size and texture. They also learn to identify different sources of water such as lakes, streams, rivers, and oceans, and identify useful products formed from rocks, soil, and water.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students Identify and group objects as water product, soil product, and rock product.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: Describing texture of soils, Identifying components of soil based on size, Identifying and describing rocks, soil and water.
Expository Text Passage The Three R’s of Conservation: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle
TEKS: 1.1A, C; 1.4A; 1.7C
Unit Weather Information
Science Concepts TEKS 1.8 A, D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module students describe weather and understand that weather information can be recorded by observing, measuring, and describing weather conditions such as hot or cold, clear or cloudy, calm or windy, and rainy or icy. They learn and demonstrate that air is all around us and wind is moving air which can be observed by the motion of objects.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students will demonstrate an understanding of how weather affects their daily lives by selecting appropriate clothing based on different weather conditions.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: Observing wind as moving air, appropriate clothing based on weather conditions, recording weather conditions, measuring relative temperature using thermometers.
Expository Text Passage Exploring What Scientists Do – Meteorologists: Scientists Who Study Weather
TEKS: 1.1A, B, C; 1.2A, B, C, D; 1.3B, C; 1.4A, B; 1.8A, C
Unit Day and Night, and Seasons
Science Concepts TEKS 1.8 B, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that there are different objects visible in the sky during the day and different objects visible at night. They observe the changes in the shape of objects in the sky during the day and during the night. They learn to differentiate seasons of the year based of activities, surroundings, and temperature.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students identify the activities performed during the course of the day and the greetings that are associated with different times of the day. They identify and differentiate the activities associated with the different seasons.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the students’ understanding of the following concepts: appearance and shape of objects in the sky and the time of day, seasons of the year and distinct features associated with each season.
Expository Text Passage Observing Objects in the Sky – Exploring the Moon
TEKS: 1.1A; 1.2A, B, C, D, E; 1.3B, C; 1.4A(clocks, notebooks); 1.6D; 1.8B
Unit Basic Needs of Living Things
Science Concepts TEKS 1.9 A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module students learn the differences between living and nonliving things. They are made aware of the factors that make a thing living or nonliving. They learn the basic needs that help living things survive and grow.
Interactivity In this Interactivity students match an organism with its food needs and shelter.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test student’ understanding of the following concepts: needs of plants, shelters of animals, differences between living and nonliving things.
Unit Depending on Each Other
Science Concepts TEKS 1.9 B, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn about how living things in an environment depend on each other to meet their basic needs. They learn that animals depend on plants for food, air and shelter and plants depend on animals for spreading their seeds and sometimes for water and nutrients (as in the case of indoor plants). They also learn that animals sometimes depend on each other to meet their basic needs. They understand that plants convert energy from sunlight to a form that can be used by them and animals and that such an interdependence for energy can be depicted using diagrams called food chains.
Interactivity In this Interactivity, students observe and record different examples of interdependence among plants and animals in a park, forest, and pond environment.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test student understanding of the following concepts: basic needs of plants and animals, food chains, interdependence among plants and animals to meet their basic needs.
Expository Text Passage Organisms and Environments – Animals Need Homes
TEKS: 1.1A, B, C; 1.2A; 1.3A; 1.4A; 1.9B, C
Unit Animals and their Environments
Science Concepts TEKS 1.10 A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that animals have unique external features which help them survive in a particular environment. They learn to identify the external features that help each animal survive in its environment. Students also learn that different parts of the world have different environments and the animal’s features are suited to that specific environment.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students identify the correct external feature that will help an animal survive in its environment. They also learn to use the correct name of the feature for each animal.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section tests students’ understanding of the following concepts: unique external features of an animal, how the feature helps the animal survive, and the correct name of the feature.
Expository Text Passage Exploring What Scientists Do – Entomologists: Scientists Who Study Insects
TEKS: 1.1A, B, C; 1.2A, B, C, D, E; 1.3A, B, C; 1.4A, B; 1.10A
Unit Parts of a Plant
Science Concepts TEKS 1.10 B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, the students learn to identify the various parts of a plant. They do this by comparing the various parts of a plant, including the root, stem, leaf, flower, fruit, and seed. Students also learn how each plant part helps the plant by performing individual functions.
Interactivity In this interactivity, students learn the positions of the various plant parts by placing backyard bugs on the different parts of plants. Students also learn how each plant part helps the bugs in different ways, be it providing them with shelter or food.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: needs of a plant, the uses of plant parts, functions of plant parts, identifying the parts of a plant.
Expository Text Passage Structure and Function – The Parts of a Plant
TEKS: 1.1A, B, C; 1.2A, C, D; 1.3 C; 1.4A (hand lenses, paperclips, notebooks), B; 1.10B
Unit Life Cycle of Animals
Science Concepts TEKS 1.10 C, D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that a cycle is a repeating pattern of events and that a life cycle of an animal consists of different stages in its life such as birth, growth and reproduction. They learn to identify and describe the stages in the life cycle of different animals such as a chicken and a frog. They learn that some animals such as frogs and butterflies produce young that look very different from their parents while other animals such as birds and mammals produce young that closely resemble their parents. They also learn to compare the young of different animals with their parents.
Interactivity In this Interactivity students apply their understanding of life cycles to match different young ones with their parents. They compare the physical features of the young with different sets of parents in order to make correct matches.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test student understanding of the following concepts: animal life cycles, stages in the life cycle of a frog and a butterfly.
Grade 2 Course Description
Unit Physical Properties of Matter
Science Concepts TEKS 2.5 A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students recognize that all things are made of matter. They are introduced to the physical properties of matter including shape, relative mass, relative temperature, texture, flexibility, and whether a material is a solid, liquid, or gas. They learn that these physical properties help us to describe, identify, and classify matter.
Interactivity The Interactivity is a virtual experiment in which students “use” a double pan balance to compare masses and classify them as “heavier” or “lighter” than a given object. Then, they compare their temperatures and classify them as “warm”, “cold”, or “normal”. Finally, they “use” a magnet to classify the objects as magnetic or nonmagnetic object.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: physical properties of matter including shape, relative temperature, texture, and states of matter.
Unit Changes in Matter
Science Concepts TEKS 2.5 B, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students are presented with examples to demonstrate that cutting, folding, sanding, freezing, or melting changes the physical properties of objects but does not change the matter that makes up the object. They observe and compare changes caused by heating and cooling. They recognize that heating can sometimes change the matter that the object is made of.
Interactivity The Interactivity is a virtual experiment in which students predict the changes that may be caused by heating and cooling different materials. Then, they place the materials in the oven and the freezer and observe the changes caused by heating and cooling.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students understanding of the following concepts: changes caused by folding, heating and cooling (evaporation, melting, freezing, and changes in temperature).
Unit Introduction to Mixtures
Science Concepts TEKS 2.5 D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that materials with different physical properties physically combine to form a mixture. They also observe how different materials when put together, may have functions that the parts could not do by themselves. They learn to select the right materials for the right job based on the physical properties of the materials.
Interactivity The Interactivity is an experiment wherein the students use various materials with different physical properties to create a combination that serves a particular function. They test the properties of the various materials provided to select the right material.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students understanding of the following concepts: physical properties of objects, functions of different materials, identifying mixtures.
Unit Effect of Energy on Matter
Science Concepts TEKS 2.6 A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students observe how increasing or decreasing amounts of light, heat, and sound energy affect various objects. They investigate the effects of light energy on brightness, sound energy on loudness and softness, and investigate how the amount of heat energy can make some things melt or freeze.
Interactivity The Interactivity is an experiment wherein students investigate how increasing or decreasing heat energy can affect objects. They identify the change in energy needed to cause a particular change in an object, observing the time taken to melt different materials.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students understanding of the following concepts: changes caused by heating and cooling, effect and use of light energy, effect of sound energy on loudness and softness.
Unit Using Magnets
Science Concepts TEKS 2.6 B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students observe the use of magnets in everyday life. They learn about the different uses of magnets, where to find magnets, and how magnets work. They observe how magnets attract and repel each other.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students learn how to make a magnet and identify the two poles through careful observation. Safety measures while doing an experiment is emphasized.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the students’ understanding of the following concepts: identifying objects that are attracted to a magnet and objects that use magnets, and using scientific vocabulary.
Unit On the Move
Science Concepts TEKS 2.6 C, D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students observe the changes in position of a moving object. They learn to mark and record the distance an object moves. Students also learn and observe the different kinds of motion in objects, such as a cup rolling and a ruler sliding.
Interactivity The interactivity is designed as an experiment that allows a student to observe and record the movement of different objects by tracing their motion on a white sheet of paper. This is done by allowing the student to “dip” an object in paint and then letting it slide down a ramp to trace a path on a white sheet of paper.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test student’ understanding of the following concepts: force, types of motion, instruments used to measure distance, and position.
Unit Natural Resources
Science Concepts TEKS 2.7 A, B, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that rocks are found everywhere and can be described and classified based on their physical properties such as size, texture, and color; They also learn to identify and compare the properties of natural sources of freshwater and saltwater; and distinguish between natural and manmade resources.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students identify and classify resources as natural and man-made resources.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: Identify between natural and man-made resources, describing rocks based on physical properties, identifying natural sources of freshwater and saltwater.
Expository Text Passage The Three R’s of Conservation: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle
TEKS: 2.1A, C; 2.2D, E; 2.4A; 2.7C
Unit Weather and the Water Cycle
Science Concepts TEKS 2.8 A, B, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn to measure and record patterns in data and seasonal information to understand and predict the weather. They identify the importance of weather and the seasons on clothing and activities. They are introduced to different tools that measure and record the weather. They understand the processes in the water cycle, including evaporation, condensation, and precipitation, as connected to weather conditions.
Interactivity In this Interactivity, students first match clothing and activities with the correct seasons and then label the seasons. They also solve a jigsaw puzzle to complete pictures of seasonal cycle, water cycle, and the day and night cycle and label them.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students understanding of the following concepts: processes in the water cycle, reading patterns in data provided, effect of seasons on clothing.
Expository Text Passage Exploring What Scientists Do – Meteorologists: Scientists Who Study Weather
TEKS: 2.1A, B, C; 2.2A, B, C, D; 2.3B, C; 2.4A, B; 2.8A, C
Unit Sky World
Science Concepts TEKS 2.8 D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn the changes that occur in the sky through the day. They observe the changes that occur during sunset and sunrise. They also observe how the sky changes from clear to cloudy. Students are made aware of the changing shapes of Moon in the night sky. They also observe stars.
Interactivity The Interactivity is a virtual experiment that traces the apparent movement of the Sun during a single day. It allows a student to mark the position of the Sun through the day, with respect to a fixed point. Students can drag and drop stickers onto a dome—which represents the sky—to mark the Sun’s position at a particular time.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students understanding of the following concepts: objects in the sky, patterns of objects in the sky, and the effect of clouds on weather.
Expository Text Passage Observing Objects in the Sky – Exploring the Moon
TEKS: 2.1A; 2.2A, B, C, D, E; 2.3B, C; 2.4A; 2.8D
Unit Living Things and Their Environment
Science Concepts TEKS 2.9 A, B, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn the basic needs that living things need to survive. They learn factors in the environment that affect growth and behavior such as migration, hibernation, and dormancy of living things. Students also compare the different ways in which organisms depend on the environment and on other organisms. They learn how to draw food chains.
Interactivity This is a simple interactivity that teaches a student the dependence of organisms on each other. This is done by asking the student to arrange organisms in the correct order in a given food chain.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students understanding of the following concepts: needs of organisms, behavior with relation to the changes in environment, and dependence demonstrated through food chains.
Expository Text Passage Mammals: Large and Small
TEKS: 2.1A, C; 2.2A, C, D, E, F; 2.3B, C; 2.4A (hand lens, notebooks, computers, safety goggles), B; 2.9A; 2.10A
Unit Animal and Plant Adaptations
Science Concepts TEKS 2.10 A, B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that adaptations are physical and behavioral features that animals and plants have developed over time to help them survive in their environments. They learn that physical adaptations in animals are body parts such as fins, wings, feet, teeth, claws, beaks and body coverings, and behavioral adaptations include hibernation, migration and living in communities. They learn that some of the physical adaptations in plants include stems, roots, leaves, vines, tendrils and flowers.
Interactivity In this Interactivity, students apply their understanding of animal and plant adaptations to identify the adaptations in different animals and plants. They also sort the different animal and plant adaptations into physical and behavioral adaptations.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test student understanding of the following concepts: physical and behavioral adaptations in animals, physical and behavioral adaptations in plants.
Expository Text Passage Organisms and Environments – The Venus Fly Trap
TEKS: 2.1A, B; 2.2A, B, C, D, E, F; 2.4A (hand lens, notebooks, terrariums, nonstandard measurement tools); 2.9A, C; 2.10B
Expository Text Passage Mammals: Large and Small
TEKS: 2.1A, C; 2.2A, C, D, E, F; 2.4A (hand lens, notebooks, computers, safety goggles); 2.9A; 2.10A
Expository Text Passage Structure and Function – The Parts of a Plant
TEKS: 2.1A, B, C; 2.2A, B, C; 2.3 C; 2.4A, B; 2.10B
Unit Life Cycles of Insects
Science Concepts TEKS 2.10 C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that the life cycles of some insects such as butterflies, ladybugs and moths include four distinct stages namely the egg, larva, pupa and adult. They learn that the life cycles of some other insects such as dragonflies, cockroaches and grasshoppers include three stages namely the egg, nymph and adult, and that the nymph resembles the adult. They compare and describe the different stages in the life cycle of an insect. They also understand that metamorphosis is the changes in form as an insect goes through the different stages of its life cycle.
Interactivity In this Interactivity, students apply their knowledge and understanding of a butterfly life cycle. They observe the physical features of each stage in order to correctly identify it. Once all the stages are identified, students arrange the different stages in the correct order of occurrence.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test student understanding of the following concepts: different stages in a butterfly life cycle, metamorphosis, life cycle of a cockroach.
Expository Text Passage Exploring What Scientists Do – Entomologists: Scientists Who Study Insects
TEKS: 2.1A, B; 2.2A, B, C, D, E, F; 2.3 C; 2.4A, B; 2.10B
Grade 3 Course Description
Unit Observing Physical Properties
Science Concepts TEKS 3.5 A
Instruction Module In this module, students recognize that all objects are made of matter. They are introduced to the physical properties of matter such as temperature, mass, magnetism, and density. They learn that these properties can be observed and measured using tools and equipment. They are also introduced to the concept of buoyancy.
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section of the module, students first identify the tools or measuring devices used to measure temperature and mass. Then, they read the temperature or compare masses.
Matter and Mass Simulation: In this simulation students will predict and measure the mass of objects that have the same volume but are made out of different materials.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: tools used to measure physical properties, materials that are attracted to magnets, hardness of materials, reading thermometers, and relative masses. The additional questions test students’ understanding of density and buoyancy.
Activities Observing Physical Properties: Sink or Float – TEKS 3.1A, B; 3.2A, B, C, D, F; 3.4A, B; 3.5A
Measuring Water Temperature (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 3.1A, B; 3.2A, B, C, D, F; 3.4A, B; 3.5A
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.5A
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.5A
Unit States of Matter
Science Concepts TEKS 3.5 B, C
Instruction Module In this module, students learn how to describe and classify samples of matter as solids, liquids, and gases. They differentiate between solids, liquids, and gases, and recognize that solids have a definite shape, and liquids and gases take the shape of their container. They learn that solids, liquids, and gases differ in their properties because of the difference in the arrangement of the particles of matter within them. They predict and observe changes in the state of matter caused by heating or cooling.
Interactivity In the interactive section of the module, students identify and classify given materials as solids, liquids, or gases, based on their physical properties.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: properties of solids, liquids, and gases, and the arrangement of particles of matter in each of them. The additional questions test students’ ability to recognize the properties of solids, liquids, and gases, the tools used to measure mass and volume, and the processes of melting, freezing, and evaporation.
Activities States of Matter and Venn Diagram – TEKS 3.2B, C, D; 3.5B
Matter and Energy: Dissolving a Sugar Cube – TEKS 3.1A, B; 3.2A, B, C, D, F; 3.4A, B; 3.5C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.5B
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2F; 3.5C
Unit Mixtures
Science Concepts TEKS 3.5 D
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to mixtures. They learn that a mixture is created when two or more materials are physically combined. Through various examples, they learn that the ingredients in a mixture retain most of their physical properties. They learn about some of the techniques and tools used to separate the ingredients of mixtures.
Interactivity In the interactive section of the module, students identify mixtures and sort given materials into two groups - “mixture” and “not a mixture” (pure substances).
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: mixtures and pure substances, and tools and techniques used to separate mixtures based on the physical properties of the ingredients. The additional questions test students’ ability to identify the properties of the ingredients in a mixture and suggest the most suitable tools and techniques to separate them.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2F; 3.5D
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2A, B, F; 3.5D
Unit Energy
Science Concepts TEKS 3.6 A
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the concept of energy. They learn that energy can exist in different forms, including mechanical, light, sound, and heat/thermal energy. They learn how each of the forms of energy is useful in everyday life.
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section of the module, students identify the correct form of energy that they need to use to perform a task, as they move through a maze.
Exploring the Uses of Mechanical Energy simulation: In this simulation students will explore how the energy in a twisted rubber band is transformed into mechanical energy in a spool racer.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: the Sun as the main source of energy on Earth, and the different forms of energy used for different purposes. The additional questions test students’ ability to identify the different forms of energy used for different purposes and recognize the importance of the energy from the Sun to life on Earth.
Activities Energy: Observing Sound (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 3.1A, B; 3.2A, B, C, D, F; 3.4A, B;3.6A
Sound Energy: Make a Speaker Activity – TEKS 3.1A, B; 3.2 B, F; 3.4A, B; 3.6A
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.6A
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.6A
Unit Force
Science Concepts TEKS 3.6 B, C
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to force and the effects of force on an object. They differentiate between balanced and unbalanced forces. They learn how position and motion of an object can be changed by pushing and pulling, and that the effect of the force depends on the mass of the object. They are introduced to forces such as magnetism, friction, and gravity. They learn through examples that force is required to do work and that machines such as pulleys make work easier.
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section of the module, students observe the changes in motion of different objects and identify the force that caused the changes, such as friction and gravity. They also observe the motion of a toy car on different surfaces and recognize how the nature of the surface affects frictional forces.
Force and Distance simulation: In this simulation students will observe and measure the distance moved by four carts filled with loads of different masses, when pushed with the same amount of force. Based on the results, they will infer which cart has the greatest mass.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: the effect of the nature of the surfaces on friction, balanced and unbalanced forces, direction of gravity and friction, and the effect of mass on the amount of force required to move an object. The additional questions test students’ ability to identify the forces that caused changes in an objects position or motion, recognize the similarities between gravity and magnetism, and identify examples of work.
Activities Force STEM Activity – TEKS 3.2A, B, D, F; 3.4A; 3.6B
Force – Push or Pull? – TEKS 3.2C; 3.6B, C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2B; 3.6B
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2B; 3.6B
Unit Soil Formation
Science Concepts TEKS 3.7 A
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the various components of soil and learn to differentiate between sand, silt, and clay based on particle size and texture. Students learn how soils are formed by weathering of rock and the decomposition of plant and animal remains.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students identify the different components of soil in a soil sample.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: formation of soil, the different components of soil, and the physical properties of soil including color, texture, and particle size.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2B, F; 3.3C; 3.7A
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2B, D, F; 3.7A
Unit Earth’s Ever Changing Surface
Science Concepts TEKS 3.7 B
Instruction Module In this module students learn about the rapid changes in Earth's surface caused by volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and landslides. They learn about tectonic plates and faults. They learn how plate movements can cause earthquakes. They learn how earthquakes can sometimes cause tsunamis and landslides. They observe and recognize the changes in Earth's surface cause by the movement of glaciers, such as U-shaped valleys and lakes.
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section of this module, students are presented with “before” and “after” pictures of landforms changed by earthquakes, volcanoes, and glaciers. The students identify the natural forces that changed them.
How Volcanoes Change the Earth simulation: In this simulation students will observe how the thickness of the magma and the amount of dissolved gases it contains affects the type of eruption and the structure of the volcano.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: the various natural forces that change the surface of the Earth and the features that they form, including earthquakes, landslides, avalanches, and tsunamis.
Activities Earth’s Changing Surface: Changes that Occur Quickly – TEKS 3.2B, D, F; 3.7B
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.7B
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.7B
Unit Landforms
Science Concepts TEKS 3.7 C
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the different landforms on Earth, including mountains, hills, valleys, and plains. They learn about the landforms formed by water such as beaches, bays, deltas, caves, lakes, islands, archipelagos, and peninsulas.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students complete a jigsaw puzzle by identifying landforms based on clues or descriptions.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: different landforms including mountains, rivers, plateaus, plains, islands, archipelagos, hills, deserts, continents, and the forces that created them.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2B, D, F; 3.7C
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2B, D, F; 3.7C
Expository text passage/ activities Landforms: Mount Everest – TEKS: 3.1A, B; 3.2B, C, D; 3.3C, D; 3.4A,B; 3.7C
Unit Earth’s Natural Resources
Science Concepts TEKS 3.7 D
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the characteristics of natural resources that make them useful in products and materials. They learn the difference between renewable resources such as oxygen, freshwater, soil, plants and animals, and nonrenewable resources such as coal, oil, natural gas, and minerals. They recognize the different ways by which natural resources can be conserved.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students identify the different natural resources that are used in order to make a boot.
Quiz The questions in the assessment test students' understanding of the following concepts: renewable and nonrenewable resources, resources that can be recycled and reused, and different ways to conserve resources. The additional questions tests students ability to identify renewable and nonrenewable resources, and recognize ways of conserving resources.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2B, F; 3.7D
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2 F; 3.7C
Unit Weather
Science Concepts TEKS 3.8 A
Instruction Module In this module, students observe and learn how to measure, record, and compare day-to-day weather changes. They learn about the tools used to measure air temperature, wind direction, and precipitation. They learn how seasons are caused and recognize the importance of information gathered from satellite images.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students observe and record weather conditions such as temperature, precipitation, and wind speeds for three different cities.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section and the additional questions test students' understanding of the following concepts: thermometers and temperature, precipitation, weather patterns, changes in weather, tools and equipments used to measure weather conditions, weather information using charts and tables.
Activities Measuring the Weather – TEKS 3.1 B;  3.2C, E, F;  3.3 A, D;  3.4A; 3.8A 
Constructing a Weather Map of My City – TEKS 3.2B, C, D, F; 3.4A; 3.8A
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.8A
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.8A
Expository text passage/ activities Weather: Measuring the Wind: TEKS 3.1A, B; 3.2B, C, D, F; 3.3D; 3.4 A, B; 3.8 A
Unit Earth, Moon and Sun
Science Concepts TEKS 3.8 B, C
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about the Sun as a star composed of gases, that provides light and heat energy and recognize the importance of the energy from the Sun in the water cycle. They recognize the phases of the Moon. They observe models that illustrate the relationship of the Sun, Earth, and Moon, including orbits and positions.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students “place” the Sun, the Moon, and Earth in their correct orbital positions in the solar system. Then, they identify the correct object based on the characteristics of the Sun, the Moon, and Earth.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: the physical characteristics of the Sun, orbits and rotations of the Earth and the Moon, and characteristics features of the Moon.
Activities The Sun, Earth and Moon as a System – TEKS 3.1A, B?  3.2 A, B, C, D, F? 3.3 A, C, D? 3.4A? 3.8C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2D, F; 3.8B
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.8B
Expository text passage/ activities The Rainiest Place in the United States – TEKS 3.1A, B? 3.2B, 3.3C, D; 3.4 A, B? 3.8B, C
Unit The Solar System
Science Concepts TEKS 3.8 D
Instruction Module In this module students are introduced to the eight planets in the solar system. They learn about the characteristics of the planets and their position in relation to the Sun. They also learn about the characteristics of the Sun.
Interactivity This module does not include an interactive section.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: planets and their positions in relation to the Sun, and the characteristics of the Sun.
Activities The Solar System: Order of the Planets – TEKS : 3.2B, D, F; 3.8D
The Solar System – Planet Identification – TEKS 3.2C, D, F; 3.8D
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.8D
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.8D
Unit Habitats and Organisms
Science Concepts TEKS 3.9 A
Instruction Module In this module, students understand what is meant by an ecosystem and a habitat and learn to identify different types of ecosystems. They also learn to identify the different living and n0onliving components of an ecosystem. Students understand how to differentiate between the terms ‘population’ and ‘community’ and learn to describe the kinds of interactions that exist between different organisms in a community. Students also learn to identify suitable habitats for organisms.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students apply their understanding of the type of organisms that make up a pond community to identify which organisms belong to a pond ecosystem and which ones do not.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: organisms found in different ecosystems, basic needs of organisms, populations, and communities, components of an ecosystem, and interactions between organisms in an ecosystem.
Activities Habitats and Organisms – TEKS 3.2B, F; 3.9A
Observing Organisms in a Water Sample Using a Microscope- TEKS 3.1A, B; 3.2B; 3.4A; 3.9A
Organisms and Their Environments – TEKS 3.1 B? 3.2 B, C, D, F? 3.3C, D; 3.9 A
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2B, F; 3.9A
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2F; 3.9A
Expository text passage/ activities The Brown Tree Snake - TEKS 3.1A, B; 3.2 A, B, F; 3.4 A, B; 3.9 A
Unit Food Chains
Science Concepts TEKS 3.9 B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that organisms depend on one another for energy and nutrients and that these relations between organisms can be represented as a flow diagram called a food chain. They understand that organisms can be classified as producers, consumers or decomposers based on how they get their energy. They also learn that consumers can be herbivores, carnivores or omnivores based on the type of food they eat. Students understand that many food chains can be interconnected to form food webs.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students apply their understanding of food chains. They arrange organisms in the correct order of who eats what and also identify which organisms are producers, herbivores, carnivores, omnivores and decomposers.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: components of food chains and food webs, impacts of adding to or removing organisms from ecosystems, and types of organisms in food chains and food webs.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2 B, C, D, F; 3.9B
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2 B, C, D, F; 3.9B
Unit Environmental Changes
Science Concepts TEKS 3.9 C
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that environments are constantly changing and can be altered either naturally or by human activities. They learn to describe how organisms such as beavers act as eco-engineers to alter their environment. Students also learn to describe the environmental changes caused by floods, droughts and fires.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students study visuals representing different environmental changes and identify the factors responsible for causing those changes.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: factors that cause changes in ecosystems, effects of droughts, floods, and fires on ecosystems, effects of human activities on ecosystems.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2D, F; 3.9C
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2D, F; 3.9C
Unit Adaptations
Science Concepts TEKS 3.10 A
Instruction Module In this module, students learn how structures and behaviors of plants and animals allow them to survive in their environments.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students select organisms that belong in the desert environment from a group of organisms, by studying their adaptations.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: physical adaptations of plants and animals, behavioral adaptations of plants and animals, how adaptations help organisms survive in their environments.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2F; 3.10A
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2F; 3.10A
Expository text passages/ activities Insect Adaptations – TEKS 3.1A, B; 3.2 A, B, C, D, F; 3.4A; 3.10 A
Unit Inherited Traits
Science Concepts TEKS 3.10 B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that characteristics which are passed on from parent to offspring are called inherited traits. Students identify some inherited traits of animals, plants and human beings.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students apply their knowledge of inherited traits of animals and plants to correctly identify the parent of given offspring based on inherited traits.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: inherited traits in humans, plants, and animals, learned characteristics in humans and animals, differences between inherited traits and learned characteristics.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2B, D, F; 3.10B
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2B, D, F; 3.10B
Unit Growth and Change
Science Concepts TEKS 3.10 C
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about life cycles and what is meant by simple life cycle and metamorphosis. They learn to describe the simple life cycles of some animals such as the pigs and platypuses, and also of animals such as frogs and ladybugs, which undergo metamorphosis. They also learn about the life cycles of plants and understand that plants can be classified as annuals, biennials or perennials based on the number of growing seasons in their life cycles.
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section of this module, students apply their understanding of plant and animal life cycles to identify the types of life cycles that different organisms undergo.
Comparing Life Cycles of Plants simulation: In this simulation students will compare the length of time it takes for different plants to complete one life cycle.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: simple life cycles in animals, metamorphosis in animals, plant life cycles and classification of plants into annuals, biennials and perennials, based on the number of growing seasons in their life cycles.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 3.2B, D, F; 3.10B
Journal #2 – TEKS 3.2B, D, F; 3.10B
Expository text passages/ activities Lifecycles: Fireflies - TEKS 3.1A, B; 3.2 B, C, D, F; 3.4 A, B; 3.9 A; 3.10 A, 3.10 C
Grade 4 Course Description
Unit Measuring Physical Properties
Science Concepts TEKS 4.5 A
Instruction Module In this module, students learn to measure, compare, and contrast physical properties of matter, including size, mass, volume, states (solid, liquid, gas), temperature, magnetism, and the ability to sink or float. They learn that the physical state of matter depends on the energy and arrangement of the particles of matter. They learn about some of the tools that are used to measure the physical properties of matter such as thermometer, triple beam balance, and graduated cylinder.
Interactivity In the interactive section of the module, students “drop” various objects in water and observe them as they float or sink. Based on their observations, they decide whether or not the object is denser than water.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: floating and sinking, relative density, measurement of volume, and states of matter. The additional questions test students’ ability to identify the correct tools and units to measure mass, read temperatures, and identify the states of matter.
Activities Measuring the Temperature of Pure Water and Salt Water- TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2A, B, C, E, F; 4.3 A; 4.4 A, B; 4.5 A 
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.2D, F; 4.5A
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.F; 4.5A
Expository text passages/ activities Measurement: Measuring, Comparing and Contrasting Sizes – TEKS 4.1A, B? 4.2A, B, C, D, E, F?  4.3 B, D?  4.4 A, B?  4.5A 
Unit Changing States of Matter
Science Concepts TEKS 4.5 B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that matter can be grouped into solids, liquids, and gases based on their physical properties. They learn about the arrangement and the forces of attraction between the particles of matter. They predict and observe the changes caused by heating and cooling. They learn how heating and cooling causes the particles of matter to gain or lose energy.
Interactivity In the interactive section of the module, students identify the energy change (adding heat or removing heat) required to bring about specific changes in the states of matter.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: changes in states of matter caused by heating or cooling, arrangement of particles of matter and forces between them in solids, liquids, and gases, sequence of changes in a materials caused by heating or cooling, and the processes of melting, freezing, boiling, and condensation. The additional questions test students’ ability to interpret information from charts and graphs, and recognize the energy changes of the particles of matter during heating and cooling.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.2D, F; 4.5B
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.2D, F; 4.5B
Unit Separating Mixtures
Science Concepts TEKS 4.5 C
Instruction Module In this module, students learn to differentiate between mixtures and pure substances. They are introduced to solutions, homogeneous mixtures, and heterogeneous mixtures. They learn that a mixture can be separated into its ingredients using various tools and techniques, including the use of magnets and sieves, and the basics of chromatography.
Interactivity This module includes a number of snippets of interesting information and does not include an interactive section.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: homogeneous and heterogeneous mixtures, solutions, and separation of mixtures using tools and techniques. The additional questions test students’ ability to identify homogeneous and heterogeneous mixtures and identify tools used to separate mixtures based on the properties of the ingredients.
Activities Comparing Mixtures and Solutions – TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2A, B, C, D, F; 4.4A, B; 4.5 C
Identifying Mixtures and Solutions – TEKS 4.2D, F; 4.5C
Journal entries TEKS – 4.2D, F; 4.5C
TEKS - 4.2D, F; 4.5C
Unit Forms of Energy
Science Concepts TEKS 4.6 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the different forms of energy, including mechanical, sound, electrical, light, and heat/thermal. They learn that sound requires a material medium to travel through, unlike light and heat which can travel through vacuum. They are introduced to the processes of heat transfer including conduction, convection, and radiation. They learn about conductors and insulators of heat and electricity. They recognize why some materials make better sound insulators. They learn about transparent, translucent, and opaque materials.
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section of the module, students are presented with various situations and are required to identify the different forms of energy.
Simulation: Conductor or Insulator? In this simulation students will test different materials to find out whether they are electrical conductors or insulators.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: meaning of energy, sound waves, transparent, translucent, opaque materials, and conductors and insulators. The additional questions test students’ ability to recognize the units of measurement of energy, interpret information from charts, and recognize that sound travels fastest though solids.
Activities Forms of Energy (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 4.1B; 4.2A, B, D, F; 4.4A, 4.6A
Conductors and Insulators (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2A, B, C, D, F; 4.3A; 4.4A 4.6B
Journal entries Journal #1 – question 1 – TEKS 4.2B, D, F; 4.6B
    question 2 – TEKS 4.2F; 4.6A
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.2F; 4.6A
Unit Electrical Circuits
Science Concepts TEKS 4.6 C
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to static and current electricity. They learn that there are two types of charges, positive and negative. They learn that electricity travels in a closed path, creating an electrical circuit. They learn about electrical conductors and insulators. They are introduced to the electromagnetic field and learn how electricity is used to make electromagnets, and how magnets are used to produce electricity (generators).
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section, students are “given” a set of items that include electrical conductors and insulators, a switch, a battery, and a light bulb. The students are required to select the correct items to construct an electric circuit. They also identify and select words that are related to current electricity from a list of words.
Electromagnets-An Investigation simulation: In this simulation students will explore an electromagnetic field by setting up an experiment to investigate how the number of turns of wire in the coil wrapped around a nail affects the strength of an electromagnet.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: Electrical conductors and insulators, components of an electrical circuit, electric current, open and closed circuits, and electric and magnetic fields. The additional questions test students’ ability to recognize the most essential components of an electric circuit, identify insulators, recognize the effect of the number of turns in the coil and the current on the strength of an electromagnet.
Activities Electrical Circuits – Electromagnets (STEM Activity) – TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2A, B, C, D, E, F; 4.3C, D; 4.4A; 4.6C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.2F; 4.6C
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.2B, F; 4.6C
Unit Forces on an Object
Science Concepts TEKS 4.6 D
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to different kinds of forces including, gravity, friction, and magnetism. They learn the difference between balanced and unbalanced forces and recognize the effects of force on an object. They learn the difference between mass and weight and know that the weight of an object is a measure of the gravitational force on the object. They observe and learn that friction depends on nature of the surfaces.
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section of the module, students observe the movement of an object and identify the force that causes the changes in motion.
Temperature’s Effect on Magnetic Force simulation: In this simulation students will determine how temperature affects the force of a magnet by setting up a simple investigation.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: balanced and imbalanced forces, direction of frictional forces, gravity and weight, and the units of measuring force. The additional questions test students’ ability to identify objects that are attracted to magnets, recognize surfaces on which friction is the least, recognize positions of magnets when they attract or repel each other, and identify the effects of force on an object.
Activities Testing the Effects of Force on an Object (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2A, B, C, D, E, F; 4.3D; 4.4A, B; 4.6D
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.2D, F; 4.6D
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.6D
Unit Soil Properties and Experiments
Science Concepts TEKS 4.7 A
Instruction Module In this module students learn to identify and describe the properties of soils, including color and texture, capacity to retain water, and ability to support the growth of plants. They learn that soil can be classified as sand, silt, or clay based on particle size and that soil contains humus.
Interactivity/ Simulation This module does not include an interactive section.
Soil Properties-How Much Air Is In There simulation: In this simulation students will investigate the volume of air displaced by water in different soil samples and relate it to pore space, a physical property of soil.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: properties of soil such as color, texture, water retention, amount of humus, sizes of soil particles, types of soils, organisms present in the soil, and experiments to demonstrate the different soil properties.
Activities Activity 1: Soil Properties and Experiments – TEKS 4.2D, F; 4.3A; 4.7AActivity 2: Soil Properties and Experiments (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2A, B, C, D, F; 4.4A, B; 4.7A
Activity 3: Observing the Properties of Sand Using a Microscope (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2B; 4.4A; 4.7A
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.2F; 4.7A
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.2F; 4.7A
Expository text passages/ activities Tools Scientists Use: Microscopes – TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2B, C, D, F; 4.4A, B; 4.7A
Unit Observing Change
Science Concepts TEKS 4.7 B
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the slow changes to Earth's surface caused by weathering, erosion, and deposition by water, wind, and ice. They recognize how fossils in sedimentary rock layers provide clues to the changes that may have occurred on Earth.
Interactivity In the interactive section of the module, students observe fossils in layers of rock and order them from the oldest to the most recent, and use them as clues to infer about the environment of the region in the past.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: changes to the Earth’s surface, weathering, erosion, dissolving, deposition, rock layers, and fossils, use of data in charts and tables to identify and understand changes.
Activities Changes on the Earth’s Surface – TEKS 4.2F; 4.7B
Expository Text Passages Journal #1 – TEKS 4.7B
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.2B, D, F; 4.7B
Unit Conserving Resources
Science Concepts TEKS 4.7 C
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to Earth's resources and they learn the difference between renewable and nonrenewable resources. They classify resources including air, plants, water, and animals as renewable resources and coal, oil, and natural gas as nonrenewable resources. They recognize the importance of conservation of resources.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students classify and group resources as renewable and non-renewable resources. Then, they identify which nonrenewable resource is used the most for a certain purpose that is mentioned.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: renewable and nonrenewable resources, properties of renewable and nonrenewable resources, conservation and actions that help conserve natural resources. The additional questions also test students' ability to recognize the importance of replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy resources.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.7C
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.7C
Unit Energy from the Sun and Weather
Science Concepts TEKS 4.8 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that the Sun is the main source of Energy for Earth. They learn how to measure and record changes in weather and make predictions using weather maps, weather symbols, and a map key. They learn about the continuous movement of water above and on the surface of Earth through the water cycle and recognize the role of the Sun as a major source of energy that powers the water cycle.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students arrange pictures in the correct sequence to depict how the Sun’s energy is responsible for the weather, formation of fossil fuels, and the food we eat.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: the Sun as the primary source of energy on Earth, responsible for the formation of fossil fuels and the food we eat. The additional questions also test students’ understanding of symbols used on weather maps, cold and warm fronts, high and low pressures, and the forms of precipitation.
Activities Using Weather Maps to Predict Weather – TEKS 4.2B, C, D; 4.3C, D; 4.8A
Energy from the Sun and Weather (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2B, C, D, F; 4.3C; 4.4A; 4.8B
Creating a Weather Map – TEKS 4.2B, C, D; 4.3C; 4.4A; 4.8A
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.8B
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.2B, D; 4.8A
Unit Recognizing Patterns in Changes
Science Concepts TEKS 4.8 C
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to daily patterns, tides, seasonal patterns, and the different phases of the Moon. They understand how the Sun and the Moon are responsible for these patterns.
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section of this module, students arrange pictures in the correct sequence to depict patterns in the seasons, patterns in the apparent movement of the Sun based on the observation of shadows at different times of the day, and patterns in the lunar cycle.
Shadows and Seasons simulation: In this simulation students will investigate and recognize that the length of a shadow follows a pattern throughout the year.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: patterns in weather, day and night, lunar cycle, and tides. The additional questions test students’ ability to interpret and draw conclusions from data given in the form of graphs, tables, and chart.
Activities Recognizing Patterns in Changes – TEKS 4.1A; 4.2B, C, D, F; 4.4A; 4.8C
The Moon and Tides – TEKS 4.2B, C, D; 4.8C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.2A, F; 4.8C
Journal #2 – TEKS4.2F; 4.8C
Unit Producers and Consumers
Science Concepts TEKS 4.9 A
Instruction Module In this module, students understand what is meant by an ecosystem and that many organisms live in different ecosystems. They learn that organisms can either be producers, consumers, or decomposers and that each organism plays a unique role in its ecosystem.
Interactivity In the interactive section of the module, students apply their understanding of consumers, and decomposers and sort organisms as herbivores, carnivores, omnivores, or decomposers, based on their food preferences.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: relationships between organisms in an environment, types of organisms in an environment, and classification of organisms based on the type of food consumed by them.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.2B, D, F; 4.9A
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.9A
Unit Food Webs
Science Concepts TEKS 4.9 B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn to describe the flow of energy through food chains and food webs and predict how changes in the ecosystem, such as forest fires, affect food webs. They understand that organisms in an ecosystem are linked to one another for energy and learn to describe the impacts of change in population of one organism on the other organisms in its ecosystem.
Interactivity In the interactive section of the module, students apply their understanding of food chains to identify the roles of organisms in a food chain and the correct order of energy flow.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: flow of energy through food chains and food webs, role of producers, consumers, and decomposers in an ecosystem, and factors affecting populations of organisms in food chains and food webs.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.9B
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.9B
Expository text passage/ activities The Brown Tree Snake and Descriptive Investigation – TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2A, B, C, D, F; 4.4A, B; 4.9B
Unit Environments and Adaptations
Science Concepts TEKS 4.10 A
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about adaptations and the two kinds of adaptations that organisms have, namely structural and behavioral adaptations. They learn how an organism’s adaptations help it to survive in its natural environment and meet its basic needs.
Interactivity In this interactive section, students use their understanding of adaptations and the types of adaptations to identify whether an organism’s adaptation is structural or behavioral.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: structural adaptations of organisms in different environments including mimicry and camouflage, behavioral adaptations such as migration, and effects of changing environments on organisms.
Activities Journal #1 – TEKS 4.10A
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.2B, D, F; 4.10A
Expository text passages/ activities Insect Adaptations (Descriptive Field Investigation) – TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2A, B, D, F; 4.3D; 4.4A; 4.10A
Unit Traits and Characteristics
Science Concepts TEKS 4.10 B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that characteristics that are passed on from parents to offspring are called inherited traits. They also learn that some behavioral characteristics in humans and animals that are not inherited and are a result of experiences, are called learned characteristics.
Interactivity In this interactive section, students learn to distinguish between inherited traits and learned characteristics by identifying whether different pictures show inherited traits or learned characteristics of organisms.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: inherited traits of organisms and learned characteristics in humans and animals.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.2F; 4.10B
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.2F; 4.10B
Unit Comparing Life Cycles
Science Concepts TEKS 4.10 C
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about life cycles and understand that the life cycles of plants and animals can be either simple or complex. They learn about the different stages of development of organisms with complex life cycles such as frogs and butterflies. They also learn to compare organisms with simple and complex life cycles.
Interactivity In this interactive section, students apply their understanding of complex life cycles to arrange the different stages in the life cycles of a butterfly, a beetle, and a radish plant, in the correct order.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: simple and complex life cycles, metamorphosis in animals with complex life cycles such as frogs and butterflies, comparison of life cycles of different organisms.
Activities Life Cycle of a Dandelion (Descriptive Field Investigation) - TEKS 4.1A, B; 4.2A, B, C, D, F; 4.4A, B; 4.10C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 4.2B, F; 4.10C
Journal #2 – TEKS 4.2B, D, F; 4.10C
Grade 5 Course Description
Unit Physical Properties of Matter
Science Concepts TEKS 5.5 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that matter can be classified based on physical properties, including mass, magnetism, physical state (solid, liquid, and gas), relative density (sinking and floating), solubility in water, and the ability to conduct or insulate thermal energy or electric energy. They are presented with information about the properties of solids, liquids, and gases and recognize that the mass of an object is a constant property. They learn that the boiling and freezing/melting points of substances are constants and identify the boiling point and freezing point of water.
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section of the module, students identify the boiling point, the melting point, and the freezing point of water on the Celsius scale.
Thermal Energy—Conductor or Insulator simulation: In this simulation students will classify materials as thermal insulators or thermal conductors by conducting a simple investigation.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: conductors and insulators, properties of solids, liquids, and gases, and attraction to magnets. The additional questions test students’ ability to identify the boiling and freezing points of water, draw conclusions from information given in a chart, and recognize that liquids have a definite volume.
Activities Classifying Matter (STEM Activity) – TEKS 5.1B; 5.2A, B, C, D, F; 5.4A; 5.5A
Using Physical Properties to Classify Matter – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2A, B, C, D, F; 5.4A, B; 5.5A
Journal entries Journal 1 – TEKS 5.5A
Journal 2 – TEKS 5.5A
Unit Mixtures and Solutions
Science Concepts TEKS 5.5 C, D
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with various examples of mixtures. They observe and learn that some mixtures maintain physical properties of their ingredients. They identify changes that can occur in the physical properties of the ingredients of solutions, such as dissolving salt in water. They differentiate between homogeneous and heterogeneous mixtures. They learn that the physical properties of the ingredients help to separate mixtures, and learn about the various tools and techniques used.
Interactivity/ Simulation This module does not include an interactive section.
Properties of Mixtures simulation: In this simulation students will investigate to find out whether particles of different materials maintain their size, which is a physical property, or dissolve when mixed with water.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: mixtures, tools and techniques used to separate mixtures based on the physical properties of the ingredients, and solutions. The additional questions test students’ ability to identify techniques to separate a mixture, recognize properties that change when a solution is formed, and recognize that the mass of the ingredients does not change when a mixture is created.
Journal entries Journal 1 – TEKS 5.5C, D
Journal 2 – TEKS 5.5D
Unit Energy Conversions
Science Concepts TEKS 5.6 A
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the different forms of energy, including mechanical, light, thermal, chemical, electrical, and sound energy. They learn how each of the forms of energy is useful in everyday life. They learn that energy can be transformed from one form to another but it can neither be created nor destroyed.
Interactivity This module does not include an interactive section.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: sources of energy, different forms of energy, thermal energy as the energy of the moving particles of matter, and transformations of energy. The additional questions test students’ ability to recognize the form of energy that plants need for photosynthesis, and identify energy transformations.
Activities Exploring Uses of Energy – TEKS 5.2G; 5.6A
Converting Thermal Energy to Motion (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2B, C, D, F; 4.4A, B; 5.6A
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.6A
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.2D; 5.6A
Unit Electricity
Science Concepts TEKS 5.6 B
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to electricity and electrical circuits. They learn that the flow of electricity in circuits requires a complete path through which an electric current can pass. They learn about some of the uses of electricity such as to produce light, heat, and sound. They learn how electricity is used to make temporary magnets (electromagnets) that can be used in electric doorbells and junkyard cranes.
Interactivity/ Simulation In the interactive section of the module, students use components such as wires and batteries to “build” electrical circuits that light up a bulb and make an electromagnet.
Investigating Circuits simulation: In this simulation students will compare how electric current flows through a series and parallel circuit.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: essential components of an electrical circuit and an electromagnet, open and closed circuits, uses of electricity, and the role of switches in an electrical circuit. The additional questions test students’ ability to compare and contrast the energy transformations taking place in a light bulb and a radio, recognize energy conversions in an electric toaster, and recognize how an electromagnet works.
Activities Design a Switch for an Electric Circuit (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2A, B, C, D, F; 5.3C; 5.4A, B; 5.6B
Using an Electrical Circuit to Pop a Balloon (Observational Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2B, C, D, F; 5.4A, B; 5.4A, B;5.6B
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2F; 5.6B
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.2D; 5.6B
Unit Light
Science Concepts TEKS 5.6 C
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to light and its characteristics. They learn that light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object or travels through one medium to another. They learn the differences between opaque, translucent, and transparent materials. They recognize that light can be reflected and refracted and learn about the construction and uses of lenses.
Interactivity This module does not include an interactive section.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: reflection, refraction, refraction through lenses and its uses, and transparent, translucent, and opaque objects. The additional questions test students’ ability to identify examples of refraction and reflection, and translucent objects.
Activities The Properties of Light – TEKS 5.1B; 5.2C, D, F; 5.3C; 5.4A; 5.6C
Light Reflection and Different Surfaces (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 5.2B, C, D, F, G; 5.3A; 5.6A
Why Rainbows Form – TEKS 5.1A; 5.2B, C, D, F, G; 5.3C; 5.4A, B; 5.6C
Exploring the Properties of Light – TEKS 5.2C, D, F, G; 5.4A; 5.6C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2D; 5.6C
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.6C
Unit Effects of Force
Science Concepts TEKS 5.6 D
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to forces and recognize the effects of force on an object. They learn about speed and acceleration. They learn that force in measured in newtons and a spring scale can be used to measure force. They observe how changes in motion of an object depend on the amount of force applied and the mass of the object. They learn that weight is a measure of the force of gravity on an object and depends on the mass of the object. They observe that friction depends on the nature of the surfaces.
Interactivity/ Simulation This module does not include an interactive section.
Testing the Effects of Force- Friction simulation: In this simulation students will design an experiment and investigate the effect of friction on the speed of a car rolling down a ramp.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test students’ understanding of the following concepts: gravity and weight, friction, and other forces that affect the motion of an object. The additional questions test students’ ability to identify the relation between speed and acceleration, recognize the tools used to measure force, and recognize the effect of the surface on frictional forces.
Activities The Effect of Force on an Object (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2A, B, C, D, E, F, G; 5.3A; 5.4A, B; 5.6D
How the Direction of the Force Affects the Motion of an Object (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2A, B, C, D, E, F, G; 5.3A; 5.4A, B; 5.6D
The Effect of Mass on the Motion of an Object (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2A, B, C, D, E, F, G; 5.3A; 5.4A, B; 5.6D
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.6D
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2A, B, C, D, E, F, G; 5.4A, B; 5.6D
Unit Energy Resources
Science Concepts TEKS 5.7 A, C
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the processes that led to the formation of sedimentary rocks and fossil fuels. They learn about alternative energy resources such as wind, solar, hydroelectric, geothermal, and biofuels.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students identify an alternative source of energy that can be developed based on the different landscapes and available resources that are presented.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: formation of sedimentary rocks, formation of fossil fuels, alternate energy resources, and nonrenewable and renewable energy resources.
Activities Processes that Lead to the Formation of Fossil Fuels and Sedimentary Rocks – TEKS 5.2C, D, G; 5.7A
Alternative Energy Sources at Home – TEKS 5.2G; 5.4A; 5.7C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.7C
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.7C
Journal #3 – TEKS 5.2C, D, F, G; 5.7C
Unit Changes on Earth’s Surface
Science Concepts TEKS 5.7 B
Instruction Module In this module, students understand how landforms such as deltas, canyons, and sand dunes are the result of changes to Earth's surface by wind, water, and ice. They recognize the processes of weathering, erosion, and deposition.
Interactivity This module does not include an interactive section. It includes an experiment that demonstrates the effect of the steepness of a slope on erosion by water.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: weathering, erosion, and deposition as processes that continually change the surface of the Earth and the landforms formed by these processes.
Activities A Changing Earth – TEKS 5.2C, D, F, G; 5.3A; 5.7B
Observing Erosion and Deposition (Observational Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2A, B, C, D,F, G; 5.3D; 5.4A, G;5.7B
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2D, G; 5.7B
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.2G; 5.7B
Expository text passages/ activities Changes on Earth’s Surface – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2C, D, F, G; 5.4A, B; 5.7B
Unit Learning from the Past
Science Concepts TEKS 5.7 D
Instruction Module In this module, students understand that evidence of changes can be gathered from photos taken before and after an event. They recognize the significance of using sedimentary rock sequences and fossils as evidence of past environments and living organisms. They learn how fossils are formed. They recognize that the shape of the continents and fossils found across continents can be used as evidence that the continents were once joined, as proposed by Wegener.
Interactivity This module does not include an interactive section.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: sequence of sedimentary rock layers, using fossils to understand past environmental conditions, types of fossils, and plate tectonics.
Activities
Expository Text Passages
Unit Weather or Climate?
Science Concepts TEKS 5.8 A
Instruction Module In this module, students learn the difference between weather and climate. They learn that factors such as temperature, humidity, and air pressure affect the climate and weather conditions.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students observe pictures of and classify them as ‘weather’ or ‘climate’ based on whether it is a short term or a long term condition.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: weather and climate, temperature, humidity, wind, and air pressure. Some of the questions also test students’ ability to interpret data represented as a graph or a table.
Activities Weather or Climate? (Field Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A; 5.2C, D, G; 5.4A; 5.8A
Determining Wind Direction (Observational Field Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A; 5.2C, D, F; 5.3C; 5.4A; 5.8A
Benjamin Franklin: Meteorologist – TEKS 5.2D, F, G; 5.3D; 5.8A
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.8A
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.2C, D, F; 5.8A
Journal #3 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.8A
Unit The Water Cycle
Science Concepts TEKS 5.8 B
Instruction Module In this module, students identify the significance of cycles and understand and recognize the various processes that govern the water cycle such as evaporation, condensation, precipitation and infiltration.
Interactivity This module does not include an interactive/simulation section.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding and ability to identifying the different processes of the water cycle.
Activities The Water Cycle (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2 A, B, C, D, F; 5.3A; 5.4A, B; 5.8B
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2C, D, F; 5.8B
Journal #2 - TEKS 5.2.D, F; 5.8B
Expository text passages/ activities The Rainiest Place in the United States – TEKS 5.1B; 5.3A, C; 5.4A; 5.8B
Unit Earth Cycles
Science Concepts TEKS 5.8 C
Instruction Module In this module, students understand that Earth rotates on its axis once approximately every 24 hours causing the day/night cycle and the apparent movement of the Sun across the sky. They learn how Earth’s tilted axis causes seasons as Earth orbits the Sun. They learn about the lunar cycle and recognize the phases of the Moon.
Interactivity This module does not include an interactive section.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: phases of the Moon, the lunar cycle, and the effects of rotation and revolution of Earth.
Activities Day and Night and the Movement of the Sun Across the Sky – TEKS 5.2D, F, G; 5.3C; 5.4A; 5.8C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.8C
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.8C
Journal #3 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.8C
Unit Characteristics of the Sun, Moon, and Earth
Science Concepts TEKS 5.8 D
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about the characteristic features of the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun. They compare the Earth and the Moon on the basis of characteristics such as mass, size, density, gravity, atmosphere, temperature, presence of water, impact craters, and the nature of the surface. They also compare the Sun with the Earth and the Moon. They learn about solar winds, sunspots, and solar flares and understand that reactions in the Sun’s core produce energy which we experience on Earth as light and heat.
Interactivity This module does not include an interactive section.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment section test students' understanding of the following concepts: characteristic features of the Sun, the Moon, and the Earth, comparisons of the three based on landforms, compositions of the atmosphere, and gravity. The additional questions also test students’ ability to interpret information from a graph.
Activities Characteristics of the Sun, Moon, and Earth – TEKS 5.2C, D, F; 5.8D
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.8D
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.8D
Unit Organisms and their Environment
Science Concepts TEKS 5.9 A
Instruction Module In this module, students observe the way organisms live and survive in their ecosystem by interacting with the living and non-living elements. They learn that all organisms need certain resources such as food, water, and shelter, and that they compete for these limited resources. They also learn about food chains and food webs.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students apply their understanding of the basic needs of organisms to construct artificial environments such as terrariums and aquariums. They select an organism and then select the components that the organism would need in order to survive.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: the living and nonliving components of an ecosystem, food chains and food webs, and types of relationships between organisms in an ecosystem.
Activities Organisms’ Interactions within their Ecosystem (Observational Investigations) – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2B, C, D, F, G; 5.3A; 5.4A, B; 5.9A
Predator vs. Prey (Observational Field Investigation) – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2B, C, D, E, F, G; 5.4A; 5.9A
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.9A
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.9A
Journal #3 – TEKS 5.9A
Expository text passages/ activities Animal Interactions: Sea Anemones and Clownfish – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2C; 5.4A, B; 5.9A; 5.10A
Unit Energy Flow through Food Webs
Science Concepts TEKS 5.9 B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn to describe how energy obtained from the Sun flows through different food chains and food webs, from producers to consumers to decomposers. They learn about food chains and food webs.
Interactivity In the interactive section of the module, students arrange organisms of different food chains in the correct order of energy flow and form food webs by identifying the correct links between food chains.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: energy flow through food chains and food webs, different types of consumers based on food preferences, and energy pyramids.
Activities Energy Flow through Food Webs – TEKS 5.2D, F, G; 5.9B
A Meadow Food Web – TEKS 5.2C, D, G; 5.9B
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2C, G; 5.9B
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.2G; 5.9B
Journal #3 – TEKS 5.2C, D, F, G; 5.9B
Expository text passages/ activities Organisms and Environments: The Brown Tree Snake – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2C, D, F; 5.4A, B; 5.9B
Unit Changes in Ecosystems
Science Concepts TEKS 5.9 C
Instruction Module In this module, students observe how organisms live and survive in their ecosystem by interacting with the living and non-living elements. They learn about the harmful impacts of human activities on different ecosystems and also the ways by which humans can minimize damage caused.
Interactivity In the interactive section of the module, students apply their understanding of factors affecting ecosystem stability to predict the impacts of different changes on an estuary ecosystem.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: types of organisms that make up a food chain, namely producers, primary consumers, secondary consumers and decomposers, impacts of introducing exotic species in an ecosystem, impacts of altering the composition of organisms in an ecosystem, negative and positive impacts of human activities on ecosystems.
Activities Predicting Effects of Changes to an Ant Farm Ecosystem – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2B, C, D, F, G; 5.4A, B; 5.9C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.9C
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.9C
Journal #3 – TEKS 5.2C, D, F; 5.9C
Unit Carbon dioxide-Oxygen Cycle
Science Concepts TEKS 5.9 D
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about the different biological processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, and decomposition, which are part of the carbon dioxide–oxygen cycle. They also learn to identify the significance of the carbon dioxide–oxygen cycle to the survival of plants and animals.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students identify processes and organisms that increase or decrease carbon dioxide and oxygen levels in the environment.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: photosynthesis, respiration and decomposition, role of photosynthesis, respiration and decomposition in the carbon dioxide – oxygen cycle, factors leading to the disruption of the carbon dioxide – oxygen cycle.
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.9D
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.9D
Unit Adaptations and Survival
Science Concepts TEKS 5.10 A
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about the structural and behavioral adaptations of organisms in different environments. They also learn that the role an organism plays in its environment is called its niche, and that organisms are specially adapted to their niches.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students sort pictures showing adaptations of different organisms into two groups “structural adaptations” and “behavioral adaptations”.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: structural and behavioral adaptation, how adaptations help an organism survive it its environment, how organisms are adapted only to their natural environment, and niche of organisms.
Activities Adaptations – TEKS 5.2D; 5.3D; 5.10A
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.10A
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.10A
Expository text passages/ activities Insect Adaptations – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2A, B, D, F; 5.3D; 5.4A; 5.10A
Unit Inherited Traits vs. Learned Characteristics
Science Concepts TEKS 5.10 B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about the different inherited traits in plants, animals, and humans, and about learned characteristics. They also learn to differentiate between inherited traits and learned characteristics.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students identify whether the different pictures that are presented show an inherited trait or a learned characteristic.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: inherited traits in humans, plants and animals, learned characteristics in humans and animals, and differences between inherited traits and learned characteristics.
Activities Inherited vs. Acquired Traits – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2C, D, F, G; 5.10B
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.10B
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.2D, F; 5.10B
Unit Life Cycles
Science Concepts TEKS 5.10 C
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that a life cycle is the sequence of stages of growth and development in an organism’s life. They learn that most animals have simple life cycle but some animals undergo metamorphosis during their lives. They understand that metamorphosis can be either complete or incomplete, and learn to differentiate between the two.
Interactivity In the interactive section of this module, students apply their understanding of frog metamorphosis to correctly order the different stages in a frog's life cycle.
Quiz The questions in the assessment and additional assessment sections test student understanding of the following concepts: life cycles of animals and plants, simple and complex life cycles, and incomplete and complete metamorphosis.
Activities Insect Life Cycles: Comparing Complete and Incomplete Metamorphosis – TEKS 5.1B; 5.2C, D, F, G; 5.10C
Journal entries Journal #1 – TEKS 5.2C, D, F; 5.10C
Journal #2 – TEKS 5.2C, D, F; 5.10C
Expository text passages/ activities Lifecycles: Fireflies – TEKS 5.1A, B; 5.2B, C, D, G; 5.4A, B; 5.9A; 5.10A, 5.10C
Grade 6 Course Description
Unit Elements and Compounds
Science Concepts TEKS 6.5 A, B, C, D
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about the difference between an element and a compound. They learn that elements are pure substances represented by symbols and their unique properties are related to their atomic structure. They understand the difference between a physical change and a chemical change and that a chemical change leads to the formation of new substances. They learn through examples that production of a gas, change in temperature, production of a precipitate, and color change are indications of a possible chemical change.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students classify a given substance as an element or a compound based on its symbol/chemical formula. They observe the substance undergoing a change and recognize it as a physical or a chemical change.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Atomic structure, difference between an element and a compound, and difference between a physical change and a chemical change.
Activities Elements and Compounds- TEKS 6.4A; 6.5C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 6.2B, 6.5D
Journal 2 – TEKS 6.2C, D; 6.5B
Journal 3 – TEKS 6.2C; 6.5C
Unit Metals and Nonmetals
Science Concepts TEKS 6.6 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students observe and compare the physical properties of metals, nonmetals and metalloids, such as luster, ability to conduct heat and electricity, and malleability. They understand that elements can be classified as metal, nonmetals, and metalloids based on their physical properties. They learn to identify metals, nonmetals, and metalloids based on their position in the periodic table. They learn that density is unique to the element or substance and can be calculated using the formula density = mass/volume. When other properties are similar, density can be used to identify the substance.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students observe the physical properties of elements and classify them as metal, nonmetal, or metalloid. Then, given the mass and volume of the sample, they identify it by calculating its density and comparing the value with a density chart.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts: the physical properties of metals, nonmetals, and metalloids, exceptions to the above categories, how the elements are classified on the periodic table and the formula for density.
Activity Calculating Density to Identify Substances –
TEKS 6.2C, E; 6.3A; 6.4A; 6.6B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 6.2C, E; 6.6A
Unit Classifying Minerals
Science Concepts TEKS 6.6 C
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that minerals are the building blocks of rocks. They understand the different ways in which minerals form and the uses of minerals. They learn how to identify minerals using their physical properties, such as color, streak, luster, hardness, and cleavage.
Interactivity/simulation In this simulation section of the module, students identify minerals by observing their physical properties such as color, streak, luster, hardness, and cleavage and comparing the results with a mineral identification chart.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Relation of rocks and minerals, different ways in which minerals form, uses of minerals, physical properties of minerals such as color, streak, luster, hardness, and cleavage, and identification of minerals based on their physical properties
Activity Testing for Physical Properties to Identify Minerals (Experimental Investigation) –
TEKS 6.2A, C, D, E; 6.4A, B; 6.6C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 6.2C, E; 6.6C
Unit Energy Resources
Science Concepts TEKS 6.7 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the various energy resources to produce electricity including fossil fuels, nuclear energy, biomass, hydropower, geothermal energy, wind and solar energy and the advantages and disadvantages of each of them. They classify the resources as renewable resources, non-renewable resources and inexhaustible resources.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students identify an energy resource based on the clues provided and then classify it as renewable, nonrenewable and inexhaustible.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
The different types of energy resources and their classification into renewable, non-renewable and inexhaustible resources. The various power plants and their functioning. The importance of developing alternative sources of energy. Reading a power output graph and how we can develop energy resources in different areas.
Activities Managing Energy in Your Home, School, and Community – TEKS 6.1B; 6.2C; 6.7B
Energy Matters – TEKS 6.2 C; 6.2E; 6.7A
Comparing Solar Ovens (Comparative Investigation) TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2A, C, D, E; 6.3A; 6.4A, B; 6.7A
The Effect of Color on Heat Absorption in a Solar Collector (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2B, C, D, E; 6.3B; 6.4A; 6.7A
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 6.7A, B
Unit Potential and Kinetic Energy
Science Concepts TEKS 6.8 A
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with various examples that demonstrate potential and kinetic energy. They learn how factors such as mass, speed, position, and condition affect the potential and kinetic energy of an object. They differentiate between potential and kinetic energy and understand the law of conservation of energy.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students observe the movement of objects and identify the correct amounts of potential and kinetic energy at different positions of the objects.
In this simulation section, students change the height of the hills of a roller coaster and observe the effect on the movement of the roller coaster car. They record their observations and conclude that the ride is completed only when the successive hills are shorter than the previous ones. This helps them to understand the energy conversions that take place in a roller coaster ride.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Potential energy, kinetic energy, factors affecting potential and kinetic energy, and energy transformations.
Activity Potential and Kinetic Energy (Experimental Investigation) –
TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2B, C, D, E; 6.3B; 6.4A, B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 6.2C, E; 6.8A
Unit Force and Motion
Science Concepts TEKS 6.8 B, C, D
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with various examples that show the effects of force on an object. They are introduced to a few familiar forces such as friction and gravity and learn that forces acting on an object can be balanced or unbalanced. They differentiate between distance and displacement. They learn the relation between speed, distance, and time and understand how to represent it on a graph.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students recognize that weight is a force and figure out when forces are balanced and when they are unbalanced.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Distance, displacement, average speed, balanced and unbalanced forces, magnitude and direction of forces, reading a time-displacement graph, effect of nature of surface on frictional forces.
Activity Unbalanced Forces (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2B, C, D, E; 6.3A; 6.4A, B;6.8B
Representing Changes in Motion Graphically (STEM Investigation) – TEKS 6.2A, C, D, E; 6.4A; 6.8B, C, D
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1- TEKS 6.2E; 6.8B
Journal 2 – TEKS 6.2C, E; 6.8C
Unit Simple Machines
Science Concepts TEKS 6.8 E
Instruction Module In this module, students learn how the six simple machines (lever, pulley, inclined plane, wedge, screw, and wheel and axle) help to do work by changing the amount of force, the distance over which a force is exerted, and/or the direction in which a force is exerted. They learn about the different types of levers based on the position of the fulcrum, load and effort. They are introduced to the concept of mechanical advantage of a machine and understand how the mechanical advantage of a pulley system increases with the increase in the number of pulleys used.
Interactivity In this interactive section of the module, students identify the input and output forces and calculate the MA (mechanical advantage) of inclined planes. They use the relation between the length and height of a ramp to its mechanical advantage to find the length of the ramp.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Recognition and uses of simple machines, parts of a lever, identifying the type of lever, and calculation of mechanical advantage.
Activity Using Pulleys to do Work (Comparative Investigation) – TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2A, C, D, E; 6.3A; 6.4A, B; 6.8E
Using an Inclined Plane to do Work – TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2A, C, D, E; 6.4A, B; 6.8E
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 6.2C, E
Unit Heat Transfer
Science Concepts TEKS 6.9 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with the three modes of heat transfer – conduction, convection, and radiation. They learn the difference between heat and temperature. They learn that heat moves from an object at a higher temperature to an object at a lower temperature until the temperatures of both objects are the same.
Interactivity/simulation This module has two simulations. In one simulation, students set the temperatures of two materials and observe and infer that thermal energy moves from the warmer material to the cooler material. In the second simulation, students observe the time taken for heat to flow through different materials and, based on their observations, categorize the materials as thermal conductors and insulators.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Use of thermometers, heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation, and applications of these processes.
Activity Safety First! – TEKS 6.1A; 6.4A, B
Modeling Heat Transfer by Convection and Conduction (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2A, C, D, E; 6.3A, B, C; 6.4A, B; 6.9A, B
Heat Conduction – TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2A, C, D, E; 6.3B; 6.9A, B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 6.2E; 6.9A
Journal 2 – TEKS 6.4B
Unit Energy Transformations
Science Concepts TEKS 6.9 C
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with various examples to show that energy can neither be created nor destroyed. It just changes form from one to another.
They are introduced to different forms of energy such as mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, sound, nuclear, and light. They differentiate between the various types of energy and recognize the energy transformations that take place.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students are presented with various examples of energy transformations and they identify the correct sequence of energy transformations taking place
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding and ability to recognize the energy transformations that occur in various situations such as motor vehicles, electrical appliances, photosynthesis, glow sticks, video games, greenhouses, and fossil fuel plants.
Activity Energy Transformations - Project - TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2B, C, D, E; 6.3B; 6.4A, B; 6.9C
Energy Transformation – STEM – TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2B, C, D, E; 6.3B; 6.4A, B; 6.9C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 6.2E; 6.9C
Unit Plate Tectonics
Science Concepts TEKS 6.10 A, C, D
Instruction Module In this module, students “build” a model of the Earth to understand that the Earth is made up of different layers which includes the inner core, outer core, mantle and crust. They understand that the top portion of the mantle and the crust and is broken into pieces called tectonic plates. They learn about the Tectonic Plate Theory and how movement of these tectonic plates affects the Earth's surface causing geological events, such as ocean basins, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and mountain building.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students recognize the different layers of the Earth and what it is made up of, by “building” a model Earth. They also recognize the different tectonic plates and their location on the world map.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Movement of tectonic plates and the changes it brings about on Earth’s surface, the layers of the Earth, and the different Tectonic plates.
Activity Modeling the Structural Layers of the Earth (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2A, C, D, E; 6.3C; 6.4A, B; 6.10A
Major Tectonics Plates – TEKS6.2C; 6.10C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 6.2E; 6.3B; 6.10D
Journal 2 – TEKS 6.10D
Unit Rock Cycle
Science Concepts TEKS 6.10 B
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the three main types of rocks, igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. They understand that they are formed through different earth processes. They also learn that rocks continuously change through the process of the rock cycle
Interactivity In the interactive section of the module, students identify the process that formed a given rock sample and then “transform” it into another rock type by choosing the right process.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
The three types of rocks and the processes that formed them, the correct sequence of changes in each of the processes, and the rock cycle.
Activity Modeling the Rock Cycle (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2A, C, D, E; 6.3A, B, C; 6.4A, B; 6.10B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 6.10B
Unit The Solar System
Science Concepts TEKS 6.11 A, B, C
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the characteristics of the Sun and the nuclear reactions taking place. They also learn about the characteristics of the eight planets and other bodies in the solar system and the force of gravity that keeps them in orbit around the Sun. They learn about the geocentric and heliocentric views and the developments the led to the landing on the moon as well as the construction of the international space station.
Interactivity In this interactive section of the module, students identify the planets with the help of some clues and determine their correct location in the solar system.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Characteristics, composition, locations, and movements of the Sun, planets, meteors, asteroids, and comets, and historical contributions of various scientists.
Activity The Solar System – TEKS 6.3D; 6.11B
Celestial Bodies in the Solar System – TEKS 6.2C; 6.11A
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 6.2C, E; 6.11A
Journal 2 – TEKS 6.2C, E; 6.11B
Journal 3 – TEKS 6.3B; 6.11A
Unit Cell: The Basic Unit of Life
Science Concepts TEKS 6.12 A, B,
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to cells, the basic units of life. They learn that organisms can be unicellular or multicellular. The students learn that there are two different types of cells – Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic.
Interactivity In this interactive section of the module, students identify the components of cells that are common to both kinds of cells and the components which are present either in eukaryotic cells or in prokaryotic cells.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Similarities and differences between a prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell.
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 6.2E; 6.12A
Journal 2 – TEKS 6.2E; 6.3B; 6.12B
Unit Taxonomic Classification
Science Concepts TEKS 6.12 C, D
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the system of classifying organisms. They understand the hierarchy of classification beginning from domains to kingdoms and moving to species. They learn about the characteristics of each kingdom.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students classify organisms into kingdoms based on their characteristics.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Classification of organisms based on their characteristics, recognizing characteristics based on their classification, the hierarchy of classification and the differences between closely related groups.
Activity The Basic Characteristics of Kingdoms – TEKS 6.2D, E; 6.12C, D
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 6.2E; 6.12D
Journal 2 – TEKS 6.12C
Unit Ecosystems: Levels of Organization
Science Concepts TEKS 6.12 E, F
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with examples that show how living and non-living things in an ecosystem interact with each other and are interdependent. They understand that changes in one of the components can affect the whole ecosystem. They also learn about the different levels of organization in an ecosystem – individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students observe changes in one component of an ecosystem and predict its possible effects on the rest of the ecosystem.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
The difference between abiotic and biotic components of the ecosystem, interactions between the living and non-living components, and the levels of organization in an ecosystem.
Activity Levels of Organization – TEKS 6.2C; 6.12F
Evaporating Saltwater (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 6.1A, B; 6.2A, C, D, E; 6.4A, B; 6.12E
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 6.2C, E; 6.12E
Journal 2 – TEKS 6.2C, E; 6.3B; 6.12E
Grade 7 Course Description
Unit Photosynthesis and Energy Conversion
Science Concepts TEKS 7.5 A
Instruction Module In this module students understand that the food used by organisms for energy, provides the matter necessary for growth. They identify the necessary ingredients for photosynthesis and recognize the parts of the plant in which this process can take place. They learn how each of the ingredients reaches the leaf. They recognize plant adaptations that help to maximize photosynthesis.
Interactivity/simulation In this simulation, students measure the rate of photosynthesis in underwater plants exposed to varying amounts of sunlight. They make a hypothesis, record their observations and arrive at conclusions after analyzing their data.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Recognizing the structures where photosynthesis can take place, ingredients required for photosynthesis, the reason for the green color of leaves, structure of leaves, and structure of roots that help in absorption of water.
Activity Extracting Chlorophyll from Plant Leaves (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.3D; 7.4A, B; 7.5A
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.2A, E; 7.5A
Unit Cycling of Matter
Science Concepts TEKS 7.5 B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about the various ways in which nutrients such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and water are recycled between the environment and the organisms living in it. They also learn how composting helps to recycle nutrients in organic wastes. They recognize the role of decomposers in each of these cycles.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of this module, students “build” a compost pit choosing the correct materials for each layer in the compost pit.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
The importance of various nutrient cycles, role of decomposers associated with each cycle, and methods of composting.
Activity Mini Compost in a Bottle – STEM – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.3B; 7.4A, B; 7.5B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.5B
Unit Energy Flow through Ecosystems
Science Concepts TEKS 7.5 C
Instruction Module In this module, the students are presented with the concept of energy flow from the Sun to organisms, ultimately forming food chains and food webs in an ecosystem. They are also introduced to the various trophic levels and the energy pyramid.
Interactivity/simulation The interactivity of this module requires the student to make a viable food chain in order for energy to flow to the top predator and predict the amount of energy available at a particular trophic level.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Food chains, food webs, energy pyramids, biomass.
Activity Flow of Energy in Ecosystems- TEKS 7.2C, D, E; 7.3B; 7.4A; 7.5C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.2C, D, E; 7.5C
Unit Organic Compounds and the Living World
Science Concepts TEKS 7.6 A, B, C
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to organic compounds and recognize the four major organic compounds in our body. They recognize the physical and chemical changes that food undergoes during digestion to break down these organic compounds into forms that can be absorbed by the body.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students “conduct” tests using Benedict’s solution, Lugol’s solution, Biuret solution, and brown paper to identify the various organic compounds present in food items such as beans, dates, carrots, apples, and lobsters.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Structures of organic compounds and the physical and chemical changes occurring at each stage of digestion.
Activity Food in the Body – TEKS 7.2C, D, E; 7.3B; 7.4A; 7.6B
Identifying Organic and Inorganic Compounds – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.3B; 7.4A; 7.6A
Science Safety Scenario – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.4B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 7.2E; 7.6C
Journal 2 – TEKS 7.2E; 7.6C
Journal 3 – TEKS 7.4B
Unit Force, Work, and Energy
Science Concepts TEKS 7.7 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that work is done when a force applied on an object moves the object in the direction of the force. They identify situations in which work is done against situations in which work is not done.
They calculate the amount of work done and understand that work done on the machine (input energy) can never be greater than the work done by the machine (output energy). They learn that simple machines like the ramp and the pulley make work easier by changing the amount of force or the direction of the force but do not reduce the amount of work done.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students observe different situations and figure out if work is being done. They also calculate the amount of work being done using the values of the force applied and the distance moved.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Force, work, simple machines, and energy.
Activity The Energy Stored in Foods (Comparative Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.3A, B; 7.4A, B; 7.7B
Work and Force 1- TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.4A; 7.7A
Work and Force 2 - TEKS 7.2C, D, E; 7.4A; 7.7A
Calculating Work (Comparative Investigation)– TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.4A, B; 7.7A
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.7A
Journal 2 – TEKS 7.7B
Journal 3 – TEKS 7.2E; 7.7B
Unit Forces Affect Plant Growth
Science Concepts TEKS 7.7 C
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with examples of forces that cause movement of muscles and blood in humans and those that affect plant growth. They learn about germination, geotropism, and turgor pressure.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students observe the direction of growth of roots and stems of plants and decide the direction of the force of gravity. They identify the parts of the plant that exhibit positive geotropism or negative geotropism.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Forces that affect plant growth, germination, positive and negative geotropism, and turgor pressure.
Activity Forces Affect Plant Growth and Movement (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.3B, C; 7.4A, B; 7.7C
Plants and Phototropism (Comparative Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.4A, B; 7.7C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.2E; 7.7C
Unit Catastrophic Events and Ecosystems
Science Concepts TEKS 7.8 A
Instruction Module In this module, students understand that an ecosystem comprises of biotic and abiotic factors. They learn about the positive and negative effects that catastrophes like floods, forest fires, hurricanes, tornadoes, and asteroid impacts, can have on different types of ecosystems.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactivity, students predict the type of catastrophic event that has occurred in a region by examining the components of soil in that area.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Biotic and abiotic factors of an ecosystem, different types of ecosystems and the effects that various catastrophic events such as hurricanes, forest fires, floods, and asteroid impacts, have on these ecosystems.
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.8A
Unit Slow Changes in Ecoregions
Science Concepts TEKS 7.8 B
Instruction Module In this module, students recognize the various forces that cause weathering, erosion, and deposition. They differentiate between mechanical and chemical weathering. They also learn about the landforms such as deltas, valleys, alluvial fans, canyons, and moraines that are created as a result of these processes.
Interactivity/simulation In this simulation students understand the effect of acid rain on different types of rocks. They test how acid affects marble, limestone, quartz, and granite by submerging them in acid that has a pH level similar to that of acid rain. They measure and record how much mass, if any, the rocks lost after 24 hours. They analyze the data collected and arrive at a conclusion that some rocks weather more quickly than others due to their chemical composition.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
mechanical weathering, chemical weathering, abrasion, erosion, deposition, land formations.
Activity Drought and its Effect on Texas Ecoregions (Research Project) – TEKS 7.4A; 7.8B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.8B
Unit Watersheds
Science Concepts TEKS 7.8 C
Instruction Module In this module, students understand what a watershed is and recognize the importance of watersheds. They recognize that human activities can pollute surface water as well as groundwater. Increased erosion due to human activities also affects watershed. Students recognize the importance of protecting our watersheds.
Interactivity/simulation In the simulation, students collect water samples from different regions in a watershed and conduct water quality tests to discover the source of nitrogen that is entering the ocean.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Meaning of a water shed, role of gravity, boundaries of a watersheds, human activities that affect groundwater and surface water, ground water infiltration, runoff, the effects of erosion and sedimentation on watersheds.
Activity Human Activity in Watersheds (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.3B, C; 7.4A, B; 7.8C
pH Tolerance of Aquatic Organisms – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.3B; 7.4A, B; 7.8C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.8C
Unit Life in our Solar System
Science Concepts TEKS 7.9 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students recognize that Earth has unique characteristics that support life. They recognize that Earth’s atmosphere supplies oxygen to breathe, protects Earth from harmful radiation, and traps heat. Students understand that Earth receives the right amount of sunlight for photosynthesis and has the right temperatures due to its location in the solar system. They recognize that water can exist in all three forms on Earth and its gravitational force is just right to hold on to the water and the atmospheric gases.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students change the location of the Earth and predict how it would affect the amount of sunlight and temperature if Earth was closer to or further away from the Sun. Then, they change the mass of the Earth and predict its effect on the gravitational force.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Effect of mass on gravity, the role of ozone, the composition of Earth’s atmosphere and its similarity to a greenhouse, and comparing features of Earth and Mars from a data table and arriving at conclusions regarding possibility of life on Mars.
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 7.2E; 7.9A
Journal 2 – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.9A
Journal 3 – TEKS 7.9B
Unit Diversity of Life
Science Concepts TEKS 7.10 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about the biotic and abiotic factors of an ecosystem. They learn about the various biomes such as deserts, temperate and tropical grasslands, tropical rainforests, temperate forests, taiga, and the tundra; factors such as temperature and water availability, and their influence on the organisms that live in these biomes. They also observe a backyard ecosystem and recognize the importance of biodiversity in an ecosystem.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students will identify and sort organisms that belong and do not belong to a biome.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Biodiversity, biotic and abiotic factors, adaptations, environmental conditions of different biomes.
Activity Observing Biodiversity in a Schoolyard Microhabitat (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.4A, B; 7.10A
Insect Diversity (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.4A; 7.10A
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.10A
Journal 2 – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.10B
Unit Ecological Succession
Science Concepts TEKS 7.10 C
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with examples to show that ecological succession or the gradual change of plant and animal life in an area, occurs in all types of ecosystems. They also differentiate between primary and secondary succession with the help of examples. They recognize the process of ecological succession in a garden that is untended.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students recognize the different stages of ecological succession in three different ecosystems.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Ecological succession in various ecosystems, the different stages of succession, primary and secondary successions.
Activity Ecological Succession – TEKS 7.2D, E; 7.3B; 7.10C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.10C
Unit Using Dichotomous Keys
Science Concepts TEKS 7.11 A
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about traits and that organisms are classified based on traits. They are presented with various examples that show how scientists use a dichotomous key to classify organisms based on their unique traits.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students examine the leaves of different trees and use a dichotomous key to identify the trees by their common names.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Classification of organisms into groups, recognition of traits, use of a dichotomous key.
Activity Dichotomous Keys (Comparative Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.3A 7.4A, B; 7.11A
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.11A
Unit Variability and Survival
Science Concepts TEKS 7.11 B
Instruction Module In this module, students understand that there are variations in structure and behavior within a species. These variations enable the species to survive. Students are introduced to the concept of natural selection. Adaptations such as migration, hibernation, and bioluminescence help organisms to survive and reproduce.
Interactivity/Simulation In the interactive section of the module, students analyze and select the traits that might be most suitable for survival based on the environment provided.
In the simulation, students “conduct” an investigation to determine if the mass of seeds (chestnut) affects the rate of germination. They group the seeds based on their mass and observe and compare the number of seeds that grow into plants in each group. Based on their observations they infer and conclude that seeds with a greater mass provide more food to the embryo and therefore help in germination.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Natural selection, adaptations, migration, reading data from a graph, variations in a species, comparison of migration and hibernation, bioluminescence.
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.11B
Unit Natural Selection and Selective Breeding
Science Concepts TEKS 7.11 C
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about genetic traits that change over time due to natural selection and selective breeding. They recognize that environmental conditions influence natural selection whereas humans influence selective breeding. They learn about hybridization and inbreeding as types of selective breeding through examples.
Interactivity/Simulation In the simulation, students investigate and find out if the shape of the beaks of finches is an adaptation to the kind of food available. They use different kinds of pliers to represent beaks and observe the type of food particles that can be picked up by each.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Natural selection, selective breeding, reading data from a graph regarding natural selection in a population, comparing hybridization and inbreeding.
Activity Selective Breeding – TEKS 7.2E; 7.3A; 7.11C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 7.2E; 7.11C
Journal 2 – TEKS 7.2C, E; 711C
Journal 3 - TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.11C
Unit Internal Structural Adaptations
Science Concepts TEKS 7.12 A
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with various examples that show how organisms have structures that help them adapt to their environments. They learn that organisms can have structural, behavioral, and physiological adaptations. They recognize that structural adaptation can be external or internal. They recognize how internal structural adaptations like fish gills, bird’s hollow bones, and xylem and phloem in plants help the organism survive in their environment.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students click on different parts of an organism and learn how that structure helps the organism to adapt to its environment. Then, they identify which of the adaptations is an internal structural adaptation.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Adaptations, structural, behavioral and physiological adaptations, and internal and external structural adaptations.
Activity Internal Structural Adaptations of Plants (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.3A 7.4A, B; 7.11A
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 7.11A
Journal 2 – TEKS 7.2C, D, E; 7.11A
Unit Human Body Systems
Science Concepts TEKS 7.12 B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about the various organ systems in the human body including the respiratory system, the skeletal system, the muscular system, the digestive system, the excretory system, the integumentary system, the nervous system, the endocrine system, and the reproductive system. They recognize that the structures of these systems complement their functions. They learn that organ systems work together to keep the body alive and maintain its health.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students identify organs that are missing from an organ system and drag and drop the right organ to its right location in the organ system.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Organs and organ systems in the human body, the functions of organ systems, the effects that different organs have on other organ systems.
Activity Human Body Systems – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.3B; 7.12B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.2E; 7.12B
Unit Cells to Organisms
Science Concepts TEKS 7.12 C
Instruction Module In this module, students understand that all organisms are composed of billions of cells. Cells that work together to perform common functions is called a tissue. Different tissues that work together to perform a certain job, is called an organ. Different organs work together to form an organ system. When all the organ systems work together, they form an organism.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students will recognize the levels of structural organization in plants and animals and arrange the levels according to their complexity. They will also sort different plant and animal structures according to their appropriate organizational level.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Complexity of organisms based on the specialization of cells, levels of organization including cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems and the functions of each of these.
Activity Levels of Organization of Living Things – TEKS 7.2E; 7.12C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.12C
Journal 2 – TEKS 7.2C, D, E; 7.12C
Unit Plant Vs Animal Cell
Science Concepts TEKS 7.12 D, E, F
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with the structure and functions of a eukaryotic cell. They learn about the various organelles in a cell and their functions. They differentiate between a plant cell and an animal cell. They also learn about the Cell Theory.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students “build” a plant cell and an animal cell by dragging and dropping the correct organelles to the appropriate cell.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, differences between plant and animal cells, importance of the cell wall in plants and the cell theory.
Activity Observing Paramecia (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.4A; 7.12E
Comparing Plant and Animal Cells’ Organelles – TEKS 7.2D, E; 7.12D
Light, Photosynthesis and the Production of Oxygen (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2B, C, D, E; 7.3A 7.4A, B; 7.12D, E, F
Describing Chloroplasts in Elodea Cells (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 7.1A, B; 7.2A, C, D, E; 7.3A 7.4A, B; 7.12D
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.12 D, E
Journal 2 – TEKS 7.2C, 7.12 E, F
Unit Stimulus and Response
Science Concepts TEKS 7.13 A, B
Instruction Module Students learn about the various stimuli in the environment. They understand that there are two types of stimuli, internal and external. An organism’s reaction to a stimulus is called a response. The students also learn that an organism can respond through learned behavior or by instinct and that responses can be positive, negative, or ignored.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students observe how an organism responds to a stimulus and identify whether the stimulus is internal or external and also whether the response is learned or instinctive.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
The different kinds of stimuli and responses, phototropism, homeostasis.
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.13 A, B
Unit Heredity and Genes
Science Concepts TEKS 7.14 A, C
Instruction Module In this module, students understand that organisms form more of their kind by a process called reproduction. They learn that there are different types of asexual reproduction like binary fission, budding, fragmentation, regeneration, spore formation and vegetative reproduction. They learn that sexual reproduction occurs by fusion of gametes. They recognize that conjugation is also a type of sexual reproduction. Students are presented with examples to explain the concept of hermaphrodites and parthenogenesis which are a deviation from normal sexual reproduction.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students differentiate between sexual and asexual reproduction, classify asexual reproduction as binary fission, budding, fragmentation, regeneration, spore formation and vegetative reproduction. They recognize the advantages and disadvantages of sexual and asexual reproduction.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Different types of asexual reproduction, its occurrence in various organisms and sexual reproduction.
Activity Heredity and Genes – TEKS 7.2C; 7.14C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 7.2E; 7.14A
Journal 2 – TEKS 7.14C
Unit Types of Reproduction
Science Concepts TEKS 7.14 B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn that heredity is the passing of traits from parents to offspring and traits such as color of hair, the petals of flowers, the fur of animals, and feathers of birds, are controlled by genes located on chromosomes inside the nucleus of cells. They learn that each gene is present in two copies in most plants and animals, one coming from each parent.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students place labeled boxes one inside the other in the correct order to represent the location of genes within a cell.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts: Location of genes and chromosomes, number of chromosomes, heredity and acquisition of genes from both parents.
Activity Types of Reproduction – TEKS 7.2C, E; 7.14B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 7.14B
Grade 8 Course Description
Unit Structure of the Atom
Science Concepts TEKS 8.5 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the structure of the atom. They learn about protons, neutrons, and electrons, their location in the atoms and their electrical charges. They learn about atomic number and mass number. They understand that the valence electrons determine how reactive an element is. Through examples, they learn that atoms can share or transfer electrons to form covalent bonds or ionic bonds with other atoms.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students observe the number of valence electrons in an atom. Then they observe the valence electrons in three other atoms and decide which among those is most likely to form a covalent bond with the given atom.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Atomic number, net electrical charge on an atom, force between charged particles, mass number, electron cloud, valence electrons, stable and reactive elements, covalent and ionic bonding.
Activity Protons and Electrons – TEKS 8.3B; 8.5B
Structure of the Atom – TEKS 8.2D; 8.3B; 8.5A
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.2E; 8.3B; 8.5A
Journal 2 – TEKS 8.2C, E; 8.5B
Unit Periodic Table
Science Concepts TEKS 8.5 C
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with a basic understanding of the Periodic Table. They recognize that elements are organized in the Periodic Table based on their properties. They differentiate between physical and chemical properties of elements. They learn that elements in the Periodic Table have been classified into metals, nonmetals and metalloids based on these properties. They also learn and understand atomic structures of elements.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students identify the position of an element on the Periodic Table based on its atomic structure. The student also has to recognize whether an element is a metal, a nonmetal or a metalloid based on its properties.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
The position of elements on the Periodic Table, recognizing elements based on its atomic structure and its physical / chemical properties.
Activity The Periodic Table – TEKS 8.2D; 8.5C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.2C, E; 8.5C
Journal 2 – TEKS 8.5C
Unit Chemical Reactions and Equations
Science Concepts TEKS 8.5 D, E, F
Instruction Module In this module, students apply their knowledge of the periodic table, atoms and elements as they learn about chemical formulas. Students learn how to determine the types of elements in a chemical formula and the number of atoms of each element in the formula. They understand how different substances react chemically to form new substances in a chemical reaction. They recognize the characteristics that can help detect a chemical reaction, such as a change in color, a change in temperature, odor and/ or release of gas. Students differentiate between exothermic and endothermic reactions. They are introduced to the law of conservation of mass and apply it as they learn how to determine if a chemical equation with coefficients is balanced or not.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students use the law of conservation of mass to balance chemical equations. They add/remove atoms and molecules in the reactants as well as products to balance the equation.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Chemical reactions, chemical formula, law of conservation of mass, balancing chemical reactions.
Activity Chemical Reactions and the Law of Conservation of Mass, Part 1 (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2B, C, D, E; 8.3A; 8.4A, B; 8.5E, F
Chemical Reactions and the Law of Conservation of Mass, Part 2 (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2B, C, D, E; 8.4A, B; 8.5D, E, F
Chemical Reaction (Experimental Investigation) - TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2B, C, D, E; 8.4A, B; 8.5E
Is it a Chemical Reaction? (Descriptive Investigation) - TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2B, C, D, E; 8.3A; 8.4A, B; 8.5E
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.3A; 8.5E
Journal 2 – TEKS 8.2C, E; 8.5D; 8.5F
Unit Force and Acceleration
Science Concepts TEKS 8.6 A, B, C
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with various examples that show the effects of force on an object. They are introduced to speed, velocity, acceleration and force. They learn about the Newton’s laws of motion. They recognize the relationship between force, mass and acceleration.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students “apply” different amounts of force on different masses. They observe the motion of the object and calculate acceleration in each case. They recognize the relationship between force, mass, and acceleration.
In the simulation, students “use” air pumps to apply varying amounts of force and observe the effect on a constant mass. Then they use a constant force on varying masses and observe the effects. They record their observations and arrive at a conclusion.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Distance, speed, balanced and unbalanced forces, mass, acceleration, velocity, magnitude and direction of forces, and Newton’s Laws of Motion.
Activity Investigate and Describe Applications of Newton’s Law (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 8.2B, C, D, E; 8.4A; 8.6A, B, C
Speed, Velocity and Acceleration (Experimental Investigation and STEM) - TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2B, C, D, E; 8.3A; 8.4A,; 6.8C; 8.6B
Investigating and Describing Applications of the Law of Action-Reaction (Descriptive Investigation) - TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2B, C, D, E; 8.4A, B; 8.6C
Balanced and Unbalanced Forces – TEKS 8.2C, D, E; 8.4A; 8.6A
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.2C, E; 8.6A, B
Journal 2 – TEKS 8.2D; 8.6B
Unit The Sun, Moon, and Earth
Science Concepts TEKS 8.7 A, B, C
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with models that explain the phenomena of day and night (rotation) and seasons (revolution). They learn how the positions of the Sun, Moon, and Earth cause tides and the phases of the moon.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students identify the phase of the moon given only the relative position of Sun, Moon, and Earth. Then they have to select the positions on earth that have high and low tide for that phase of the moon.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
what causes day and night, the tilt of Earth’s axis, seasons in both hemispheres, the phases of the moon, and the tides.
Activity Modeling What Causes Day and Night (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 8.1A; 8.2A, C, D, E; 8.3 B, C; 8.4A; 8.7A
Modeling What Causes the Seasons - (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 8.1A; 8.2A, C, D, E; 8.3 B, C; 8.4A; 8.7A
Describing the Lunar Cycle - TEKS 8.1B; 8.2A, C, D, E; 8.3 B, C; 8.4A; 8.7B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.7A
Journal 2 – TEKS 8.7C
Unit The Universe
Science Concepts TEKS 8.8 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students recognize the characteristics of the universe. They learn to identify stars based on their size, temperature, color, and brightness. They understand stars at different stages in their life are represented on the H-R Diagram. Students understand what galaxies are and recognize that they are classified according to their shape.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students increase or decrease the temperature of a star based on its location on the H-R Diagram. Then, they classify the star based on its luminosity and temperature.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Components of the universe, Herztsprung-Russell diagram, life cycle of a star, luminosity and temperature of a star.
Activity Plotting the Stars – TEKS 8.2D; 8.3B; 8.8A
Modeling Distances Using Light Years: Part 1 (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 8.2A, C, D, E; 8.3B, C; 8.4A; 8.8D
Modeling Distances Using Light Years: Part 2 (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 8.2A, C, D, E; 8.3B, C; 8.4A; 8.8D
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.2C, E; 8.3B; 8.8A
Journal 2 – TEKS 8.2 C, E; 8.3B; 8.8A, B
Unit The Universe - Distances and Size
Science Concepts TEKS 8.8 C, D
Instruction Module In this module students are introduced to light years. They understand that the light emitted from distant stars and galaxies can take thousands or millions of years to reach an observer on Earth. They also learn how scientists study the different wavelengths of light from distance stars and other objects in space and use it to gain information about composition of the objects. They understand how scientists compare absorption spectrums of stars to emission spectrums of elements to understand the composition of the stars.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of the module, students compare the absorption spectrum of stars and compare it with the emission spectrum of elements to analyze which element is present in the star.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Light years, comparison of wavelengths of visible light and radio waves, absorption spectrums, comparison of absorption and emission spectrums.
Activity Radio Astronomy – TEKS 8.2E; 8.8C, D
Absorption and Emission Spectra – TEKS 8.1A, 8.1B; 8.2C, E; 8.4A, 8.4B; 8.8C, D
Constructing a Model Hand-held Spectroscope (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2A, B, C, D, E; 8.3C; 8.4A; 8.8C, D
Modeling Sizes Using Light Years: Part 1 (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2A, C, E; 8.3B, D; 8.4A, B; 8.8C, D
Modeling Sizes Using Light Years: Part 2 (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 8.2C, E; 8.3B; 8.4A; 8.8C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.2C, E; 8.3B; 8.8C
Journal 2 – TEKS 8.2E; 8.8D
Unit Origins of the Universe
Science Concepts TEKS 8.8 E
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to the Big Bang Theory and the evidences that support this theory. These include Hubble’s discovery that galaxies are moving away (red shifted), Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson’s discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation, and the abundance of light elements such as hydrogen and helium in the universe.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module students observe “light waves” from an object in space and decide whether the object is stationary, moving away from, or moving towards the observer. They also recognize if the light is red shifted, blue shifted, or if there is no shift.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Studying data from a graph representing Hubble’s law, wavelengths, red shift, blue shift, Doppler shift, cosmic microwave background radiation. Big Bang Theory.
Activity Using Scientific Data as Evidence – TEKS 8.3A, B, C, D; 8.4A; 8.8E
Theories that Attempt to Explain the Origin of the Universe (Research Project) – TEKS 8.3A, D; 8.8E
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal – TEKS 8.2E; 8.8E
Unit Effects of Plate Tectonics
Science Concepts TEKS 8.9 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students understand how Wagener’s Continental Drift Theory, evidences of sea floor spreading, and the location of most earthquakes and volcanoes led to the theory of plate tectonics. They learn about the crustal features associated with divergent, convergent, and transform boundaries including volcanoes, folded mountains, fault block mountains, rift valleys, and mid-ocean ridges.
Interactivity/simulation In the interactive section of this module, students identify divergent, convergent, and transform boundaries based on their description and then identify the crustal features associated with each of them.
In the simulation section, the students recognize that thickness of the lava affects its flow rate and the type of volcanic structure that is formed. They compare liquids of different thicknesses. They observe and record the time taken by each liquid to flow down a funnel. They conclude that thinner the liquid is, the faster it flows. They infer that thick lava leads to the formation of strato-volcanoes and thin lava forms shield volcanoes.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Divergent, convergent, and transform boundaries, crustal features associated with each, evidences that support the Plate Tectonic theory, sea floor spreading, and the difference between folded mountains and fault block mountains.
Activity Crustal Features and Plate Tectonics – TEKS8.2E; 8.3B; 8.9B
Evidence that Supports Plate Tectonics Theory – TEKS 8.2D; 8.3D; 8.4A; 8.9B
Effects of Plate Tectonics 3D Mind Mapping– TEKS 8.9B
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.2C, E; 8.3B; 8.9A,B
Journal 2 – TEKS 8.3A
Journal 3 – TEKS 8.3C
Unit Topographic Maps
Science Concepts TEKS 8.9 C
Instruction Module In this module, students are introduced to topographic maps. They learn about contour lines, contour intervals, index contour lines, scale, and legends on a topographic map. They also learn how satellite views help us to identify land and erosional features.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students identify the correct elevation of a location on a topographic map and predict the slope and land feature of that location.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Reading a topographic map, satellite images, uses of this in day to day life and in science.
Activity Topographic Maps – TEKS 8.3B; 8.9C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.2C, E; 8.9C
Journal 2- TEKS 8.2C, E; 8.3B; 8.9C
Unit Climate and Weather
Science Concepts TEKS 8.10 A, B, C
Instruction Module In this module, students understand the difference between climate and weather. They understand that interactions between the Sun, the land, and the oceans cause changes in weather patterns and climate. They understand how wind and ocean currents are caused. They learn to read weather maps and identify areas of high/ low pressure and warm and cold fronts. They also understand how oceans can bring about changes in weather systems like hurricanes and El Niño.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students recognize the types of weather associated with high/low pressure and warm/cold fronts.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Convection currents, high and low pressures, El Niño, hurricanes and cold and warm fronts.
Activity El Niño – TEKS 8.2E; 8.3B; 8.10C
Using Weather Maps to Predict Weather – TEKS 8.2D, E; 8.3B; 8.10B
How Accurate are Weather Reports? (Comparative Investigation) – TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2A, B, C, D, E; 8.3A; 8.4A; 8.10A, B, C
Constructing a Model of an Anemometer (Descriptive Investigation; STEM) – TEKS 8.1B; 8.2A, 8.2C, D, E; 8.3B; 8.4A; 8.10A
Convection Currents – TEKS 8.2C; 8.2E; 8.3B; 8.10A
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.2C; 8.2E; 8.3B; 8.10C
Journal 2 - TEKS 8.2C; 8.2E; 8.3B; 8.10B
Unit Interrelationships Between Organisms
Science Concepts TEKS 8.11 A, B
Instruction Module In this module, students learn about the different biotic and abiotic factors influencing an ecosystem. They understand the different relationships such as consumer/producer, predator/prey, and parasite/host that exist in a food web.
Interactivity/simulation In the simulation section of the module, students observe the growth of two sets of red clover plants, one that is inoculated with Rhizobium bacteria and the other which is untreated. They measure the height and observe the leaves of both sets of plants at intervals of two weeks and record their observations. They arrive at a conclusion regarding the interrelationship between Rhizobium bacteria and red clover plants.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Ecosystem, biotic and abiotic factors, identifying consumer-producer, predator-prey, parasite-host relationships in a food web.
Activity Interrelationships between Organisms Activity 1 – TEKS 8.3B; 8.11A
Interrelationships between Organisms Activity 2 – TEKS 8.2D; 8.3B; 8.11B
The Importance of a Plant’s Leaves (Experimental Investigation) – TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2B, C, D, E; 8.4A, B; 8.11A, B
Interdependence in Living Systems – TEKS 8.2D, E; 8.3B; 8.11B
Depending on and Competing for Resources (Descriptive Investigation) – TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2B, C, D, E; 8.3A; 8.4A, B; 8.11B
Elodea and Saltwater (Comparative Investigation) - TEKS 8.1A, B; 8.2B, C, D, E; 8.3B; 8.4A, B; 8.11C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal - 8.2C; 8.2E; 8.3B;8.11B
Unit Environmental Changes and Organisms
Science Concepts TEKS 8.11 C
Instruction Module In this module students are presented with various examples of organisms that adapt to short-term seasonal changes by going into a state of dormancy, such as hibernation or diapause or migrating in search of warmer weather or food. They also learn that some long term environmental changes lead to a change in traits over the generations (natural selection). Organisms also deal with long-term changes through removal migration.
Interactivity/simulation In the simulation section, students recognize that the addax antelope changes color to adapt to seasonal changes. To investigate the relation between color and heat absorption, they place water filled jars of different colors under a heat lamp. They observe and record the temperature of the water after every 20 minutes and conclude that darker colors absorb more heat than lighter colors. They infer that the addax antelope changes color to adapt to seasonal temperature changes.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Diapause, physical and behavioral adaptations, removal migration, interpreting data from a graph, human activities that lead to long-term changes, hibernation, and natural selection.
Activity Environmental Changes and Organisms – TEKS 8.2E; 8.11C
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal - 8.2C; 8.2E; 8.11C
Unit Human Impacts on Ocean Ecosystems
Science Concepts TEKS 8.11 D
Instruction Module In this module, students are presented with various examples of how human activities can impact the ocean and it’s ecosystems in different ways. They are introduced to concepts such as runoff, water cycle, disruption in food webs, impact of oil spills on the environment, and destruction of coral ecosystems.
Interactivity/simulation In this interactive section of the module, students observe various human activities that could affect ocean ecosystems. They recognize the modes by which the pollution finally ends up in the ocean.
Quiz The questions in the assessment section test the student’s understanding of the following concepts:
Food webs, water cycle, pollution of oceans through various sources, especially runoff.
Activity Human Impacts on Ocean Ecosystems (Research Project) – TEKS 8.2E, 8.3A; 8.4A; 8.11D
Journal entries Journal entries are open-ended questions and prompts that may be used to engage students prior to instruction, as pre- and post-assessments to measure learning, or as opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learned as they apply acquired knowledge.
Journal 1 – TEKS 8.2E; 8.11D
Journal 2 – TEKS 8.2C, D, E; 8.11D
Biology Course Description
Unit Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells
Science Concepts TEKS 4A
Instruction Module The Instruction Module, in this unit presents content that guides students to identify and recognize the similarities and differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Students learn that one of the main differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is the presence of a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles in eukaryotic cells that is absent in prokaryotic cells.
Interactivity In the Virtual Cell Tour and Identify and Classify! Interactivities, students can take a virtual tour of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to review cell parts and their functions. They can also observe and classify a variety of different cells as either prokaryotic or eukaryotic based on observable characteristics.
TEKS- 4A, 2E, 2F, 2G
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to know when comparing and contrasting prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. When complete, students can use this guide as a study guide, and teachers can use it as an assessment piece.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Comparing Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells - TEKS 2E, 2F, 4A
Offline Activity Comparing and Contrasting Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Venn Diagram Activity TEKS 2F, 2H, 3A, 4A
Students compare and contrast the characteristics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells as they apply acquired knowledge to complete a Venn diagram.
Unit Cellular Processes
Science Concepts TEKS 4B
Instruction Module The Instruction Module, in this unit presents content that addresses different cellular processes, such as energy conversions, the synthesis and transport of molecules, and maintaining homeostasis. Students learn about the different mechanisms by which molecules are transported into and out of a cell, including diffusion, osmosis, facilitated diffusion, active transport, and vesicle mediated transport, such as endocytosis and exocytosis.
Interactivity The Cell It! Interactivity provides students with an opportunity to apply knowledge as they compare and contrast active and passive cellular transport mechanisms to complete a Venn diagram. They also apply their understanding of transport mechanisms to observe and identify the type of transport mechanism being used by a cell.
TEKS- 2F, 2G, 2H, 4B
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as a checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Cellular Processes unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to explain cellular processes, including homeostasis, energy conversions, transport of molecules, and synthesis of new molecules. When complete, students can use this guide as a study guide, and teachers can use it as an assessment piece.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Cellular Processes - TEKS 2G, 3A, 4B
Offline Activity Cellular Processes: Homeostasis- TEKS 1A, 1B, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 4B
In this activity, students investigate osmosis as a process that helps cells maintain homeostasis internally despite changing external conditions.
Unit Viruses
Science Concepts TEKS 4C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn why viruses are considered non-living. They compare and contrast viruses to prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. They also learn about the two types of viral reproductive cycles the lytic and the lysogenic cycles. They understand how viruses cause diseases, such as influenza and AIDS, and how the unique characteristics of viruses can be used to our benefit in gene therapy.
Interactivity The Virus Attack Interactivity, allows students to apply their knowledge of the lytic cycle as they construct a diagram to show the stages in the lytic reproductive cycle of a virus.
TEKS- 2F, 4C
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Viruses unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential when comparing the structures of viruses to cells, when describing viral reproduction, when describing the role of viruses in causing certain diseases and in understanding that the characteristics that make viruses unique can be used to our benefit in gene therapy When complete, students can use this guide as a study guide, and teachers can use it as an assessment piece.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Viruses - TEKS 2G, 3F, 4C
Offline Activity Viruses Making News- TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3B, 3D, 4C
In this activity, students use their knowledge and understanding of viruses and scientific evidence to evaluate the use of antiviral medications used to prevent an influenza outbreak.
Unit The Cell Cycle
Science Concepts TEKS 5A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module students are introduced to the different phases of the cell cycle, including the G1, S (DNA replication), and G2 phases of interphase and the four stages of mitosis prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. Students are also able to witness the importance of the cell cycle to the growth of organisms.
Simulation In the Onion Crysis Simulation, students first simulate how to focus a compound microscope to view a slide, as a review. Then, they perform a virtual scientific method lab activity where they use a virtual microscope to observe a slide of an onion root tip and identify the cell cycle stage each cell is in. Students analyze the data collected to draw a conclusion to solve the question presented in the beginning of the activity.
TEKS- 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 5A
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Cell Cycle unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students' attention on information that is essential to know when describing the stages of the cell cycle, including DNA replication, mitosis, and the importance of the cell cycle to the growth of organisms. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Evaluating Models - TEKS 2G, 3E, 5A
Offline Activity Describing Stages in the Cell Cycle TEKS 2F, 2G, 5A
In this activity, students apply knowledge of the cell cycle as they sequence and describe the different phases of the cell cycle, including the S phase where DNA replication occurs.
Unit Specialized Plant Cells
Science Concepts TEKS 5B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that multicellular plants are made up of several different kinds of cells that interconnect to form tissues. They learn that a plant is composed of the root system, consisting of the roots, and the shoot system that includes the leaves, the stem, and the flowers. Students learn how to identify and to describe the structure and function of the cells that make up different parts of a leaf, the stem, and the roots.
Interactivity In the Plant Cells Interactivity, students apply their knowledge of specialized plant cells to identify different types of plant cells in a leaf and then review their structure and unique functions.
TEKS 2G, 5B
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Specialized Plant Cells unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to know when examining specialized cells, including the roots, stems, and leaves of plants. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what theyve learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Specialized Plant Cells - TEKS 2G, 5B
Offline Activity Plants Special Cells TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 5B
In this activity, students use plant cell cards to identify specialized plant cells, the tissues they form and their functions.
Unit Specialized Animal Cells
Science Concepts TEKS 5B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module students learn that multicellular animals are made up of different types of cells that interconnect to form tissues. They learn that all the different types of cells form from embryonic cells. They also learn about the unique structure and functions of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets found in blood, epithelial cells found in skin, and of the cells found in skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, and cardiac muscle.
Interactivity In the Specialized Animal Cells Interactivity, students apply knowledge of specialized animal cells to identify different types of specialized cells and then match their structures to their functions.
TEKS 2F, 2G, 5B
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Specialized Animal Cells unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to know when examining specialized cells, including animal cells such as blood, muscle, and epithelium. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Specialized Animal Cells
TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 5B
Offline Activity An Animal Cell Up Close TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 5B
In this activity, students use an electron micrograph of a liver cell to identify the visible parts of the cell. Students then apply their knowledge of specialized animal cells to compare/ contrast the liver cell to other types of specialized animal cells.
Unit Cell Differentiation
Science Concepts TEKS 5C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module students are introduced to the role of gene expression in cellular diversity and complexity in multicellular organisms. Students also learn about the effects environmental factors, such as temperature, light, radiation, and exposure to chemicals, can have on cell differentiation.
Simulation The Nile River Crocodiles Simulation enables students to conduct a virtual scientific method experimental investigation to observe the effect the environmental factor, temperature, has in determining the sex of Nile River crocodiles.
TEKS 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 5C
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Cell Differentiation unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to understand how environmental factors can affect cell differentiation. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal miRNA and Cell Differentiation - TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3B, 5C
Offline Activity Cell Differentiation and lincRNA TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3B, 3D, 3F, 5C
In this activity, students research lincRNA using online resources to briefly summarize the history of the discovery of lincRNAs and the role they play in cell differentiation.
Unit Disruptions in the Cell Cycle
Science Concepts TEKS 5D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module students learn about the importance of the different phases of the cell cycle of eukaryotic cells. They are introduced to the major checkpoints and proteins that regulate the cell cycle. They also identify the consequences of defects in the cell cycle.
Interactivity In the Disruptions in the Cell Cycle Interactivity, students engage in the practical application of knowledge as they sequence images to show how disruption in the cell cycle can lead to the development of lung cancer.
TEKS 2F, 2G, 5D
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Disruptions in the Cell Cycle unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential for recognizing that disruptions of the cell cycle can lead to certain diseases such as cancer. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Disruptions in the Cell Cycle TEKS 2G, 2H, 5D
Offline Activity Selecting the Best Sunscreen TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3C, 5D
In this activity, students will apply knowledge of how disruptions in the cell cycle can lead to diseases, such as skin cancer. Students will use information about the risks associated with UV exposure and the information provided about ingredients and directions for application found on sunscreen product labels to infer, evaluate and record a list of essential criteria to consider when choosing a sunscreen product.
Unit Molecules of Heredity
Science Concepts TEKS 6A
Instruction Module This Instruction Module presents information about the components of DNA and RNA molecules. Students learn how DNA and RNA molecules are structured and identify and compare the components of DNA and RNA nucleotides. They can also access additional information on the scientists and experiments that established DNA as the molecule of heredity.
Interactivity In the Molecules of Heredity Interactivity, students apply their knowledge of the components of DNA and RNA molecules and nucleotides to construct molecules of DNA and RNA.
TEKS 2F, 2G, 6A
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Molecules of Heredity unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to identifying the components of DNA and RNA molecules. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Molecules of Heredity- TEKS 2B, 6A
Offline Activity DNA Research Timeline TEKS 2F, 2H, 3B, 3D, 3F, 6A
In this activity, students research and describe the contributions of various scientists in the discovery of DNA and its role in the study of genetics. Students use the information from their research to create a DNA Timeline. Once complete, students will use their timelines to evaluate the impact of this line of scientific research on society and the environment.
Unit DNA Replication
Science Concepts TEKS 6A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that segments of DNA, called genes, store all the information that controls the different traits of an organism. They learn how DNA is replicated and recognize the different steps of DNA replication. They also learn that DNA replication is semi-conservative and that each daughter DNA molecule consists of one original strand from the parent DNA and one newly synthesized strand.
Interactivity In the DNA Replication Interactivity, students apply their knowledge of DNA replication to identify the enzymes required during the different stages of the process.
TEKS 2G, 6A
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the DNA Replication unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to describe the process of DNA replication. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal DNA Replication TEKS 2G, 2H, 3A, 6A
Unit Universal Genetic Code
Science Concepts TEKS 6B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that the genetic code is nearly universal in the biological world. They also learn how this universality can be used for agricultural, industrial, and medical benefits.
Simulation The Help the Hospital! Simulation allows students to apply knowledge of the universal genetic code as they use DNA from a pancreatic cell and a bacterium to produce insulin through recombinant DNA technology. It emphasizes the universality of the genetic code and how it can be utilized to manufacture insulin for diabetic patients.
TEKS 2E, 2G, 6B
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in The Universal Genetic Code unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to recognize that the components that make up the genetic code are common to all organisms. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Universal Genetic Code TEKS 2F, 2G, 6B
Journal Universal Genetic Code Lab Simulation TEKS 2G, 6B
Offline Activity Drawing Inferences from Promotional Materials for Services TEKS 2A, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3B, 3C, 6B
Students use critical thinking and draw inferences based on data related to promotional materials for services.
Unit Protein Synthesis
Science Concepts TEKS 6C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn how information stored in a gene is used to make a specific protein. They learn that transcription and translation are the two stages in the synthesis of a polypeptide chain that is then packaged into the corresponding protein. Detailed models of DNA and RNA are used to help explain the process and the purpose of transcription and translation.
Interactivity In the Transcription and Translation Interactivity, students apply their understanding of the complementary base pairing rule between DNA and RNA nucleotide bases to choose the correct product in each stage of transcription and translation to produce a completed protein. They also use a codon amino acid chart to identify the amino acid that an mRNA codon codes for.
TEKS 2F, 2G, 6C
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Protein Synthesis unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to explain the purpose and process of transcription and translation. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Protein Synthesis TEKS 2.G, 6C
Offline Activity Protein Synthesis Concept Map TEKS 2F, 2H, 6C
In this activity, students use key terms to complete a concept map of the process of protein synthesis.
Unit Gene Expression
Science Concepts TEKS 6D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students are introduced to the concept of gene expression in which genetic information is used to synthesize proteins, and recognize that gene expression is a regulated process. They also learn how genes are expressed in prokaryotic cells and in eukaryotic cells.
Simulation In the Switch On, Switch Off Simulation, students conduct a virtual experimental investigation to determine whether the lactose and tryptophan operons in E. coli bacteria are switched on or off when exposed to different solutions.
TEKS 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 6D
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Gene Expression unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students' attention on information that is essential to recognize that gene expression is a regulated process. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Gene Expression TEKS 2G, 6D
Unit Mutations
Science Concepts TEKS 6E
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that mutations are nucleotide base sequence errors that can affect single or multiple genes. They learn that mutations can either be gene mutations or chromosomal mutations as they learn to identify and describe the different kinds of gene and chromosomal mutations. They also learn about the beneficial and harmful effects of different mutations.
Interactivity In this Interactivity, students apply their understanding of the different types of mutations to identify the type of mutation that is occurring and the resulting effects.
TEKS 2G, 6E
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Mutations unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to identify changes in DNA and evaluate the significance of these changes. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Offline Activity Letter Mutations TEKS 6E
In this activity, students apply their knowledge of nitrogenous base codes by using an RNA code chart to construct words instead of amino acids.
Unit Mendelian Monohybrid Crosses
Science Concepts TEKS 6F
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students understand that traits are inheritable features. They study monohybrid crosses, first performed by Gregor Mendel, to study the pattern of inheritance of a single trait. They also learn how to predict possible outcomes of different monohybrid crosses using Punnett squares.
Interactivity In the Going Batty Over Punnett Squares Interactivity, students use Punnett square crosses and knowledge of dominant and recessive traits to determine the genotype for a given bat trait.
TEKS 2F, 2B, 2H, 6F
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Mendelian Monohybrid Crosses unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to predict possible outcomes of various genetic combinations, including monohybrid crosses. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Mendelian Monohybrid Crosses TEKS 2F. 2G. 2H, 6E
Offline Activity Mendelian Monohybrid and Dihybrid Crosses TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 6E
In this activity, students complete monohybrid crosses using Punnett squares to predict possible outcomes.
Unit Mendelian Dihybrid Crosses
Science Concepts TEKS 6F
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module students study Mendelian dihybrid crosses, or crosses performed by Gregor Mendel to study the simultaneous inheritance patterns of two traits. They also learn to predict the possible outcomes of dihybrid crosses using Punnett squares.
Interactivity In the Punnett Squares Interactivity, students perform dihybrid crosses to investigate the simultaneous inheritance pattern of two different traits.
TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 6F
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Mendelian Dihybrid Crosses unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to predict possible outcomes of various genetic combinations, including dihybrid crosses. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Mendelian Dihybrid Crosses TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 6E
Offline Activity Mendelian Monohybrid and Dihybrid Crosses Activity TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 6E
In this activity, students complete dihybrid crosses using Punnett squares to predict possible outcomes.
Unit Non-Mendelian Genetics
Science Concepts TEKS 6F
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students recognize that there are many traits that do not follow Mendels laws of inheritance. They understand how and why non-Mendelian inheritance is different from Mendelian inheritance. They learn about the concepts of incomplete dominance, codominace, multiple allele inheritance, gene linkage, polygenic inheritance and sex linked inheritance.
Interactivity In the Crossing Over Interactivity, students observe the process of crossing over that occurs during meiosis and determine how the location of linked genes affects inheritance patterns.
TEKS 2.F, 2G, 6F
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Non-Mendelian Genetics unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to explain non-Mendelian inheritance. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Non-Mendelian Genetics TEKS 2G, 2H, 6F
Offline Activity Non-Mendelian Crosses TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 6F
This activity requires students to apply knowledge of predicting possible outcomes of various gene combinations using Non-mendelian crosses to make the predictions.
Unit Meiosis
Science Concepts TEKS 6G
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that meiosis results in the formation of sex cells or gametes, involved in sexual reproduction. They learn to describe the different stages of meiosis and recognize the significance of meiosis and sexual reproduction in increasing genetic variation.
Interactivity In the Phase Off! Interactivity, students apply knowledge of meiosis to observe cells and identify the stage of meiosis the cell is in. TEKS 2F, 2G, 6G
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students' attention on information that is essential to recognize and explain the significance of meiosis in sexual reproduction. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Meiosis TEKS 2G, 2H, 6G
Unit Applied Genetics
Science Concepts TEKS 6H
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students are introduced to methods and uses of DNA fingerprinting, including gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting. Students understand how a karyotype is used to classify and compare chromosomes. They describe some recombinant DNA techniques and explain how they are used.
Interactivity In the Who Done It? Interactivity, students sequence the steps of DNA fingerprinting and use the resulting DNA fingerprints to identify the suspect who committed the crime.
TEKS 2G, 2H, 6G
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Applied Genetics unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to describe how techniques such as DNA fingerprinting, genetic modifications, and chromosomal analysis are used to study the genomes of organisms. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Applied Genetics TEKS 2H, 6G
Offline Activity Using Karyotypes to Perform Chromosomal Analysis TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 6H
In this activity, students use karyotypes and chromosomal analysis to diagnose patients conditions.
Unit Evidence of Common Ancestry
Science Concepts TEKS 7A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that the evolutionary theory can be used to explain the relationships between organisms. They analyze and evaluate anatomical, biogeographical, embryological, and molecular evidence for common ancestry.
Interactivity In the Create a Cladogram Interactivity, students compare the amino acid sequences in a section of the cytochrome-c protein, of four different organisms with that of a human and construct a cladogram.
TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 7A
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Evidence of Common Ancestry unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to analyze and evaluate how evidence of common ancestry among groups is provided by the use of the fossil record, biogeography, comparative anatomy, embryology, and molecular biology. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Evidence of Common Ancestry TEKS 2G, 7A
Offline Activity Evidence of Common Ancestry- Homologous Structures Activity TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3F, 7A
Students observe, analyze, and evaluate drawings of homologous structures of 3 different mammals for evidence of common ancestry.
Offline Activity Hypotheses vs. Theories TEKS 2B, 2C, 2D, 2F
Students compare and contrast hypotheses and theories and use information that distinguishes hypotheses from theories to complete a Venn diagram.
Unit Fossils and Evolution
Science Concepts TEKS 7B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students understand that all the fossils, along with the information about the rock layers they are found in, make up the fossil record. They analyze different scientific explanations for sudden appearance, stasis, and sequential nature of groups in existing fossil records.
Interactivity In the Layer Ôn Record Interactivity, students observe and predict how different geological factors affect fossilization. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 7B
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Fossils and Evolution unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is essential to know when analyzing and evaluating scientific explanations concerning any data of sudden appearance, stasis, and sequential nature of groups in the fossil record. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Fossils and Evolution TEKS 2G, 2H, 7B
Journal The Fossil Record: Gradualism vs. Punctuated
Equilibrium TEKS 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3D, 3F, 7B
Unit Organisms and Natural Selection
Science Concepts TEKS 7C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students understand the process of natural selection. They identify traits in individuals and compare variants within a population. They observe and analyze how natural selection can bring about change in a population over time.
Simulation In the Modeling Bacterial Drug Resistance Simulation, students model the effect of natural selection in the development of penicillin resistance in a sample bacterial population. TEKS 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 7C
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Organisms and Natural Selection unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that needed in order to analyze and evaluate how natural selection produces changes in populations and not individuals. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Organisms and Natural Selection TEKS 2G, 2H, 7C
Offline Activity Drug Resistant Bacteria TEKS 2G, 2H, 3A, 7C
Students analyze and evaluate how natural selection produces change in populations, not individuals.
Unit Factors Leading to Natural Selection
Science Concepts TEKS 7D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students understand that natural selection is a process. They identify and describe the factors that can lead to natural selection such as genetic variation in a population, finite supply of resources, and the potential of a population to produce more offspring than can survive. They also learn to describe the effects of natural selection on reproductive success.
Simulation In the Food for Finches simulation, students investigate how environmental factors, such as availability of different food sources, can cause natural selection to act on traits, such as beak size and shape, and change the predominant phenotypes in a population over time. TEKS 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 7D
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Factors Leading to Natural Selection unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is needed in order to analyze and evaluate how the elements of natural selection, including genetic variation, potential to produce more offspring than can survive, and a finite supply of environmental resources, result in differential reproductive success. When complete, this can be used as a study guide and an assessment tool.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Factors Leading to Natural Selection TEKS 2G, 2H
Journal Natural Selection and Reproductive Success TEKS 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 7D
Unit Natural Selection and Biological Diversity
Science Concepts TEKS 7E
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students understand the relationship between natural selection and adaptation. They explain how natural selection, over time, can lead to the formation of new species. They recognize that speciation can occur as a result of reproductive isolation of different populations.
Interactivity In the Reproductive Isolation and Speciation Interactivity, students observe the different mechanisms of reproductive isolation and identify them. They identify the mode of speciation that occurs as a result of reproductive isolation. TEKS 2G, 2H, 7E
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Natural Selection and Biodiversity unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is needed in order to analyze and evaluate the relationship of natural selection to adaptation and to the development of diversity in and among species. When complete, this can be used as a study guide and an assessment tool.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Natural Selection and Biological Diversity TEKS 2G, 2H, 7E
Journal Adaptive Radiation and Biodiversity TEKS 2G, 2H, 3B, 7E
Unit Evolutionary Mechanisms
Science Concepts TEKS 7F
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students analyze and evaluate the effects of evolutionary mechanisms other than natural selection, such as genetic drift, gene flow, mutation, recombination, and non-random mating, on populations of organisms.
Interactivity In the Whats the Mechanism? Interactivity, students observe images representing different evolutionary mechanisms and identify the relevant evolutionary mechanism associated with each image. They identify the evolutionary processes of gene flow, genetic drift, mutation, bottleneck, and founder effect.
TEKS 2G, 2H, 7F
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Evolutionary Mechanisms unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information needed in order to analyze and evaluate the effects of other evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation, and recombination. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Evolutionary Mechanisms TEKS 2G, 2H, 7F
Offline Activities 1) Analyzing and Evaluating the Effects of Genetic Drift and Recombination TEKS 2G, 3A, 3B, 7F
After viewing the instruction module Evolutionary Mechanisms, students will research and then analyze and evaluate the effects of the evolutionary mechanisms of genetic drift and recombination.
2) Analyzing and Evaluating the Effects of Genetic Drift - TEKS 2G, 2H, 3A, 7F
In this activity, students analyze and evaluate the effect of genetic drift as an evolutionary mechanism on a population of beetles.
3) Analyzing and Evaluating the Effects of Recombination TEKS 2G, 2H, 6G, 7F
In this activity, students will analyze and evaluate the effects of recombination as an evolutionary mechanism in the variation of traits between siblings who have the same parents.
Unit Cellular Evolution
Science Concepts TEKS 7G
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students understand that the endosymbiotic theory explains the evolution of complex eukaryotes from simple symbiotic prokaryotic communities.
Interactivity In the Endosymbiotic Theory Interactivity, students label the parts of a symbiotic bacterial community and understand how the different components interact by labeling the links between them. TEKS 2F, 2G, 7G
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Cellular Evolution unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to analyze and evaluate scientific explanations concerning the complexity of the cell. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Cellular Evolution TEKS 2G, 2H, 7G
Journal Evidence of Endosymbiotic Theory TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 7G
Offline Activities 1) The History of Biology TEKS 2F, 2G, 3F, 7G
Students use the internet and other resources to research and describe the history of biology and the contributions of scientists from the early 19th century. They use the information to create a timeline that describes the history of biology and the contributions of scientists in chronological order.
2) Endosymbiotic Hypothesis and Theory TEKS 2B, 2C, 2G, 2H, 3A, 7G
Students learn about the development of the Endosymbiotic Theory from a hypothesis and use this information to distinguish the relationship between hypotheses and theories by creating an analogy.
Unit Biological Classification
Science Concepts TEKS 8A
Content covered In this Instruction Module, students are introduced to the concept of taxonomy. They compare old and current taxonomic systems, and explain why a globally standardized system is necessary and important to the scientific community.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students perform a hierarchical sorting of 8 alien organisms based on physical characteristics. They decide which characteristic best sorts the organisms into groups during each sorting stage. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 8A
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Biological Classification unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to compare old and current taxonomic systems and recognize the importance of a standardized taxonomic system to the scientific community. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Biological Classification TEKS 2G, 2H, 8A
Journal Importance of a Standardized Taxonomic System TEKS 2G, 2H, 8A
Offline Activities El Chupacabra: A New Species or Just An Urban Legend? TEKS 2A, 2B, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 8A
Students examine scientific evidence to determine whether a new species has been discovered.
Unit Classifying Organisms
Science Concepts TEKS 8B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that the hierarchical system of classification groups organisms into smaller and smaller categories based on increasing similarities in their physical characteristics. They learn that the hierarchical classification also helps to understand the evolutionary relationships between organisms. They also learn that scientists use tools called dichotomous keys to identify and classify organisms at different levels.
Interactivity In the Classifi-key-tion of Organisms Interactivity, students apply their understanding of the hierarchical system of classification to group organisms into smaller and smaller categories. They also apply their understanding of how a dichotomous key is used, to identify the order to which four different mammals belong. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 8B
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Classifying Organisms unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students' attention on information that is necessary in order to categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences shared among groups. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Classifying Organisms TEKS 2G, 2H, 8B
Offline Activities Design a Dichotomous Key TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 8B
Students design a dichotomous key to classify eight different organisms.
Unit The Six Kingdom Classification System
Science Concepts TEKS 8C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that all organisms on Earth can be sorted into three domains and further into six kingdoms, namely Eubacteria, Archaebacteria, Protista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia. They learn to compare and contrast the characteristics of organisms in these six kingdoms and also learn about the evolutionary relationships between them.
Interactivity In the Tree of Life Interactivity, students apply their understanding of how the six kingdoms are sorted in the three domains, and how organisms are sorted in Kingdom Animalia and Kingdom Plantae to complete a phylogenetic tree. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 8C
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in The Six Kingdom Classification System unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to compare characteristics of taxonomic groups, including archaebacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal The Six Kingdoms TEKS 2G, 2H, 8C
Whats in the Water? TEKS 1A, 1B, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 8C
Students work in collaborative groups to design a descriptive investigation that involves identifying protists present in samples of water collected from a designated field site.
Offline Activities
Unit Biomolecules
Science Concepts TEKS 9A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that biomolecules are large molecules synthesized by living things. They learn that there are four classes of biomolecules, namely proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. They learn about the structure and functions of these biomolecules and learn to compare and contrast their structures and functions.
Interactivity In the Origin of Life Interactivity, students apply their understanding of biomolecules to identify the kinds of biomolecules present in different foods. TEKS 2F, 2G, 9A
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Biomolecules unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to compare characteristics of taxonomic groups, including archaebacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal 1 Biomolecules TEKS 2G, 2H, 9A
Journal 2- Biomolecules TEKS 2G, 2H, 9A
Offline Activities Biomatch TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 9A
In this activity, students apply their knowledge of the structure and function of biomolecules to identify images of biomolecules and match them to their descriptions.
Unit Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration
Science Concepts TEKS 9B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that photosynthesis and cellular respiration are complex and important life processes. They learn about the different steps in these processes and compare them in terms of their reactants, products, and energy usage.
Interactivity In the Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration Interactivity, students apply their understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular respiration to complete a schematic diagram showing the relationship between the two.
TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 9B
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to compare the reactants and products of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of energy and matter. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration TEKS 2G, 2H, 9B
Unit Enzymes
Science Concepts TEKS 9C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module , students learn that enzymes are biological catalysts that speed up biochemical reactions. They learn how enzymes work to speed up reactions. They also learn to analyze and evaluate the effects of different environmental factors such as temperature and pH, and of chemicals such as cofactors and inhibitors, on enzyme activity.
Interactivity In the Interactivity, students apply their understanding of how enzymes work to identify indicated components of different enzyme catalyzed reactions. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 9C
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Enzymes unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to identify and describe the role of enzymes. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal 1 Enzymes TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 9C
Journal 2 Enzymes - TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 9C
Offline Activity Temperatures Effect on Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions TEKS 1A, B, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 9C
Students work in collaborative groups to plan and implement an experimental investigation to determine the effect of temperature change on the rate of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction.
Unit Origin of Biomolecules
Science Concepts TEKS 9D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students are introduced to the theory of abiogenesis, which can be used to explain the evolution of life on earth. They learn about the formation of simple organic molecules and their organization into long complex molecules, which eventually aggregate to form the first cell-like structures. They also analyze and evaluate the four postulates of the abiogenesis theory.
Interactivity In the interactivity, students sequence the events that ultimately led to the origin of life on Earth, as postulated by the theory of abiogenesis. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 9D
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Origin of Biomolecules unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to analyze and evaluate the evidence regarding formation of simple organic molecules. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Origin of Biomolecules TEKS 2G, 2H, 9D
Journal Origin of Biomolecules: Theories vs. Hypotheses TEKS 2G, 2H, 9D
Unit Structural Hierarchy in Biological Systems
Science Concepts TEKS 10A, B, C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students are introduced to the various levels of organization in living systems including cell, tissue, organ, organ system, and organism. They identify and describe the interactions between the systems involved in regulation, nutrient absorption, reproduction, and defense in animals. They identify and describe the interactions between the systems involved in transport, reproduction, and responses in plants.
Interactivity In the Organ Systems Interactivity, students identify the different organ systems that interact to perform a specific function. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 10A, B, C
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Structural Hierarchy in Biological Systems unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary to describe interactions that occur among systems that perform the functions of regulation, nutrient absorption, reproduction, and defense from injury or illness in animals, and functions of transport, reproduction, and response in plants; and to information that is necessary to analyze the levels of organization in biological systems, to relate the levels to each other and to the whole system. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Structural Hierarchy in Biological Systems TEKS 2G, 2H, 10A, B, C
Offline Activity Interaction of Transport and Response Systems in Plants TEKS 1A, B, 2A, 2B, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 10A, B, C
Students plan and implement a comparative investigation to determine how plant systems interact when exposed to certain stimuli.
Offline Activity Organ System Interactions in Animal Reproduction TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 10A, B, C
In this student activity, students use information from the Instruction Module to describe the interactions that occur among organ systems in animals that aid reproduction.
Offline Activity Full Body Medical Scans TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 10A, B, C
In this activity, students conduct basic research the pros and con of the promotion of full body CT scans as a preventative medical service.
Offline Activity Organ System Interactions Research Project TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3B, 10A, B, C
Students research an animal that is oviparous and use the information gained to describe how the interactions of systems involved in animal reproduction in egg-laying animals differ from those in animals that give birth to live young ones.
Unit Feedback Mechanisms and Homeostasis
Science Concepts TEKS 11A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn how internal feedback mechanisms, such as negative and positive feedback mechanisms help to maintain homeostasis. They also learn to compare and contrast negative and positive feedback mechanisms.
Interactivity In the Balance the Blood Sugar! Interactivity, students identify how the negative feedback mechanism responsible for maintaining normal blood sugar levels, responds to elevated and decreased sugar levels in the blood. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 11A
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Feedback Mechanisms and Homeostasis unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to describe the role of internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal 1- Feedback Mechanisms and Homeostasis TEKS 2G, 2H, 11A
Journal 2 - Feedback Mechanisms and Homeostasis TEKS 2G, 2H, 11A
Offline Activity Homeostasis: A Descriptive Investigation TEKS 1A, 1B, 2B, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 11A
In this activity, students plan and implement a descriptive investigation to determine how a runners respiratory system (breathing) and circulatory system (heart rate) work together to regulate and maintain homeostasis.
Unit Population and Community Ecology
Science Concepts TEKS 11B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module students analyze and evaluate how population sizes are limited by different abiotic and biotic factors.
Simulation In the Pond Watch Simulation, students explore how changing the biotic and abiotic factors affects populations in the ecosystem. Students observe, identify, manipulate and record the effects on a pond ecosystem of varying both of abiotic and biotic limiting factors. TEKS 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 11B
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Population and Community Ecology unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to investigate and analyze how organisms, populations, and communities respond to external factors. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Population and Community Ecology TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 11B
Unit Microorganisms and the Environment
Science Concepts TEKS 11C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students recognize the role of microorganisms in maintaining ecosystem stability. They learn about decomposition, nutrient cycling, and symbiosis. They also learn to describe how microorganisms can cause disruptive changes in both individual organisms and ecosystems.
Interactivity In the Microbial Colonies in You Interactivity, students identify the different parts of the human body that are normally inhabited by microorganisms. TEKS 2G, 2H, 11C
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Microorganisms and the Environment unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to summarize the role of microorganisms in maintaining and disrupting the health of organisms and ecosystems. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Microorganisms and the Environment TEKS 2G, 2H, 3A, 11C
Offline Activity Using Critical Thinking to Make Inferences TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3C, 11C
Students will draw inferences based on data related to promotional materials for products.
Unit Ecological Succession
Science Concepts TEKS 11D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students are introduced to the key concepts of ecological succession, namely, primary succession, secondary succession, and climax community. They understand and describe how primary and secondary succession can alter ecosystems.
Interactivity In the What Came First? Interactivity, students select various species to colonize an area destroyed by a forest fire and observe the stages of ecological succession. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 11D
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Ecological Succession unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to describe how events that occur during ecological succession can change populations. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Ecological Succession TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 11D
Unit Interdependence among Organisms
Science Concepts TEKS 12A
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that organisms interact with one another for various resources. They learn that interactions between two organisms in an ecosystem can either be competitive or symbiotic. They learn that symbiotic interactions include commensalism, mutualism and parasitism. They also learn to identify which organism is benefited, harmed, or remains unaffected in each type of interaction.
Interactivity In the Interactions Interactivity, students apply their understanding of the interactions between organisms to identify the different types of interactions. They also recognize the effects of the interactions on each of the organisms. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 12A
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Interdependence Among Organisms unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to interpret and describe relationships, including predation, parasitism, commensalism, mutualism, and competition among organisms. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Interdependence Among Organisms TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 12A
Unit Biological Adaptations and Survival
Science Concepts TEKS 12B
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students understand that adaptations are traits that help organisms survive in their environments and that adaptations can be structural, physiological, or behavioral. They learn to describe the adaptations of organisms living in different kinds of environments.
Simulation In the Effects of Fur Color on Marmot Survival simulation, students explore the effects of fur color on marmot survival. TEKS 2B, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 12B
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Biological Adaptations and Survival unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to compare variations and adaptations of organisms in different ecosystems. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Biological Adaptations and Survival TEKS 2G, 2H, 12B
Unit Energy Flow in the Living World
Science Concepts TEKS 12C
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn that organisms in an ecosystem depend on each other for nutrients and energy. They analyze and evaluate the energy relationships between different organisms in an ecosystem using food chains, food webs, and energy pyramids. They also learn that although matter can be recycled between the different components of an ecosystem, the flow of energy is unidirectional.
Interactivity In the Marine Energy Pyramid Interactivity, students identify the different levels of an energy pyramid for a marine ecosystem. They also identify the organisms that occupy each level in the energy pyramid, from a given list of organisms. TEKS 2E 2G, 2H, 12C
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Energy Flow in the Living World unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to analyze and explain the flow of matter and energy through trophic levels using various models, including food chains, food webs, and ecological pyramids. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Energy Flow in the Living World TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 12C
Offline Activity Energy Pyramid TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 3B, 3D, 3E, 3F, 12C
In this activity, students use the terms provided to complete a graphic of an energy pyramid model while analyzing the flow of energy through the different tropic levels of an ecological pyramid.
Unit Resources and Survival
Science Concepts TEKS 12D
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students learn about limiting factors or resources that are scarce, and understand how limiting factors affect population sizes of organisms in different ecosystems. They also learn to analyze and evaluate how human activity can cause changes in ecosystems and impact biotic and abiotic resources.
Interactivity In the Pesticide Pond Interactivity, students apply their understanding of the factors affecting population sizes of different organisms to identify the effects of pesticides on the populations of organisms in a pond ecosystem. TEKS 2F, 2G, 2H, 12D
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Resources and Survival unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to recognize that long-term survival of species is dependent on changing resource bases that are limited. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal 1 Resources and Survival TEKS 2G, 2H, 12D
Journal 2 Resources and Survival TEKS 2G, 2H, 12D
Unit Nutrient Cycling in the Environment
Science Concepts TEKS 12E
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students understand the importance of nutrient cycling. They learn about the nitrogen and carbon cycles, which describe how nutrients such as nitrogen and carbon are cycled through the environment. They learn to explain the consequences of disrupting these cycles.
Interactivity In this interactivity, students identify the factors that are involved in the different stages of the nitrogen cycle.
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Nutrient Cycling in the Environment unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students attention on information that is necessary in order to describe the flow of matter through the carbon and nitrogen cycles and to explain the consequences of disrupting these cycles. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Nutrient Cycling in the Environment 2G, 2H, 12E
Offline Activity Nutrient Cycling and the Environment Experimental Investigation TEKS 1A, 1B, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 12E
Students apply process skills and knowledge of the nutrient cycles to plan and implement an experimental investigation. Students investigate how to best prevent the consequences from excess nutrients entering water ecosystems when artificial fertilizer is added to soil for growing crops.
Unit Ecological Balance
Science Concepts TEKS 12F
Instruction Module In this Instruction Module, students understand how the interactions between biotic and abiotic components can lead to stability within an ecosystem. They describe how environmental changes can affect ecosystem stability.
Interactivity In The Water Works! interactivity, students identify the ecological impacts of different types of water resource facilities. TEKS 2G, 2H, 12F
Quiz This formative assessment is aligned to the content presented in the unit. It provides a set of multiple choice questions to use as checks-for-understanding of the concepts presented in the Ecological Balance unit.
Glossary The Glossary contains terms and definitions essential for mastery of the concepts presented in the Instruction Module. The integration of text, audio, and still and animated graphics provides both linguistic and non-linguistic representations of essential terms to help build vocabulary comprehension for better retention.
Note-taking Guide The Note-taking Guide is used with the Instruction Module to focus students' attention on information that is necessary in order to describe how environmental change can impact ecosystem stability. When complete, this can be used as a study guide by the students and as an assessment instrument by teachers.
Journal Entry The journal activity requires students to apply what they've learned and to justify their reasoning as they respond to targeted, open-ended questions and prompts.
Journal Ecological Balance TEKS 2G, 2H, 12F
Offline Activity Gaia Hypothesis: Impact of Scientific Research TEKS 2B, 2F, 2G, 2H, 3A, 3B, 3D, 3F, 12F
In this activity, students research the Gaia Hypothesis and evaluate the impact of this scientific research on society and the environment.

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